Funds available to support neighborhood Night Out 2016 activities

brighton-night-out.nltrIf your neighborhood wants or plans to participate in this year’s 32nd Annual Night Out on August 2, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods has a fund to support your event.

The Small Sparks Fund provides funding for neighborhood-initiated projects that promote community engagement and relationship building. Community groups can request up to $1000 to help fund Night Out activities such as outreach materials, cultural entertainment, music, food,  and kids’ activities, to name a few. The deadline for applications is Friday, July 1 at 5:00 p.m., but you must register first in our web-based application system to apply.

For information on the application process, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/nmf/smallsparks.htm or call 206-733-9916. The Small Sparks Fund is open to applications year-round for such activities as block parties, neighborhood sports tournaments, community picnics, and emergency preparation training, just to name a few.

Night Out is a national crime prevention event designed to heighten crime prevention awareness, increase neighborhood support in anti-crime efforts, and unite communities. To learn more or to register for Night Out, visit www.seattle.gov/police/Nightout/.

UW Students Present Ideas for Cascade P-Patch Renovation

Cascade P-Patch Open HouseBeginning in March 2016, University of Washington Landscape Architecture students began using the community driven area of Cascade Park and P-Patch for a design studio project focused on urban agriculture. Taught by Eric Higbee, Design Director at the Pomegranate Center, the students examined the social justice, community building, cultural meaning, and urban complexity of designing for urban agricultural spaces. They then prepared neighborhood, site, and precedent studies for the Cascade P-Patch and adjacent community driven areas of the park, and created individual designs.

The students will be presenting their final designs at a Community Open House on June 4 at 1pm at Mirabella (116 Fairview Ave N). The event is open to the public.

Final student products will be assembled into a booklet to support future community planning efforts for the Cascade Park and P-Patch. The long term interest is to redesign some existing areas of the P-Patch for better flow, integration, sightlines, and accessibility. The P-Patch Community Garden Program will be working with the community to narrow down ideas to one design and work to secure funding to complete the work.

If you have questions about the project, contact Sandy Pernitz, Community Garden Coordinator, at 206.684.0284.

City Announces $75,000 Summer Opportunity Fund

Summer Opportunity FundApplications are now available for the City of Seattle Summer Opportunity Fund. This fund provides $75,000 for community-based summer projects that support positive activities and opportunities for youth while reducing violence that disproportionately affects communities of color in Seattle. Community organizations, groups, and businesses are encouraged to apply.

To be considered, projects should focus on education, employment, justice, violence prevention, health, or a combination of these topics. Projects should also include opportunities to involve East African and Black/African American young men ages 18-24 living in or attending school in Seattle. The City is looking for community-based ideas and encourages applicants to leverage other resources such as community partnerships, in-kind donations, and existing resources and services.

Funded projects will receive between $5,000 and $15,000, and all programming must run between July 22 and October 31, 2016. The application deadline is Monday, June 20 by noon.

Individual application assistance sessions are available by appointment on:

  • June 2, 11:30 – 5 p.m. at the New Holly Seattle Public Library (7058 32nd Avenue S)
  • June 8, 4 – 7:30 p.m. at the Rainier Beach Community Center, Teen Room (8825 Rainier Ave S)
  • June 9, 4 – 7:30 p.m. at the Douglass-Truth Seattle Public Library (2300 E Yesler Way)

Schedule a 30-minute assistance session by emailing DON_Grants@seattle.gov. Attendance is not mandatory for funding consideration but highly encouraged.

The Summer Opportunity Fund is funded by the Seattle Human Services Department and administered by the Department of Neighborhoods.

For information, guidelines, and the application, please visit our website.

Aurora-Licton Find It, Fix It Community Walk

find it fix it logoMayor Murray’s Find It, Fix It Community Walks provide a unique opportunity for community members to identify neighborhood needs and discuss challenges directly with City leaders. Our first walk of the year will be held in the Aurora-Licton neighborhood on Tuesday, May 31 beginning at 6:00 p.m. Refreshments will be provided.

Aurora-Licton Find It, Fix It Community Walk
Tuesday, May 31, 2016, 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Meet at the Oak Tree Village Shopping Center by the AMC Loews Oak Tree 6 (Between N 100 St. and N 103 St. on Aurora Ave N.)

Schedule
6:00 p.m. – 6:20 p.m.

  • Welcome remarks from Mayor Ed Murray
  • Find It, Fix It Mobile App tutorial

6:20 p.m. – 7:15 p.m.

  • Walk commences along the following route (map):
    • East on N 100th St.
    • South on  Ashworth Ave. N
    • South on Stone Ave. N
    • West on N 90th St.
    • North on Aurora Ave. N

7:15pm – 7:30 p.m. 

  • Walk concludes at Lantern Brewing on N 95th St.
  • Department representatives and City staff available for follow-up questions

In partnership with Cities of Service, the City will offer up to $5,000 in grants for community-led projects to each 2016 Find It, Fix It Walk neighborhood. The Aurora-Licton Community Project Grant Application is available on May 25 at www.seattle.gov/finditfixit until Friday, June 10. If you have an idea for a project in Aurora-Licton, please apply today!

City of Seattle Seeks Contractors for Outreach Work to Underrepresented Communities

POEL working with members of the public at a Delridge Projects WorkshopSeattle Department of Neighborhoods is seeking individuals to do part-time outreach work to underrepresented communities in Seattle’s neighborhoods. Known as Public Outreach and Engagement Liaisons (POELs), these contractors must be connected to their respective cultures, fluent in the languages, and bi-cultural and bi-lingual. The main tasks of a POEL are to provide:

  • Quality translations.
  • Fair and equitable facilitation (in native language) to culturally specific community groups.
  • Simultaneous interpretation.
  • Feedback and expertise on cultural concerns and barriers.
  • Planning and execution of community workshops and events that parallel larger City-hosted meetings.

POELs are compensated independent contractors. The positions are generally flexible with any type of schedule and include either daytime or evening hours as well as some weekends. The applicants must have extensive experience organizing and facilitating community meetings, and must be fluent and able to interpret and translate in at least one other language. The languages we are presently seeking include Vietnamese, Chinese (both Mandarin and Cantonese), Spanish, Korean, and Somali. The applicants must live or work in the following neighborhoods:

  • North End: Especially Lake City and Northgate
  • University District
  • West Seattle

If interested, please send a resume or a short biography, plus two references to DON_Liaison@seattle.gov or:

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
POEL Program
P.O. Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124.

For more information about the POEL program, please visit our website.


See below for language translations of the original press release:

CHINESE_POEL-recruitment
KOREAN_POEL-recruitment
SOMALI_POEL-recruitment
SPANISH_POEL-recruitment
VIETNAMESE_POEL-recruitment

Neighbors Invited to Help Plan Belltown Find It, Fix It Community Walk

Welcome to Belltown Mural

Photo: Sean Davis

Belltown residents and business owners are invited to help plan the upcoming Belltown Find It, Fix It Community Walk, the second of seven Mayor-led walks happening this year. During these walks, neighbors, police, and City officials walk together to identify physical elements in the neighborhood that make it feel unsafe or poorly maintained. Once the elements are identified, the City and community work together to fix the problems.

The Belltown walk will be held on Tuesday, June 28 from 6 – 7:30 p.m. and will follow a route determined by community members serving on its Community Walk Action Team. If you are interested in volunteering for this team, contact Find It, Fix It Program Coordinator Laura Jenkins at laura.jenkins@seattle.gov or 206.233.5166.

In addition, Belltown community members are invited to apply for up to $5,000 to complete community projects that improve the safety or appearance of their neighborhood. To apply for a Belltown Community Project Grant, community members can find the application at seattle.gov/finditfixit beginning Thursday, June 23 through Friday, July 8.

Lastly, community members don’t have to wait for the walk to report safety needs or city maintenance issues. They can use the Find It, Fix It mobile app:

Mayor Murray Seeks New Members for Landmark Preservation Board

Before/After Supply Laundry Building SLU

Supply Laundry Building in SLU (designated as Seattle Landmark in September 2005)

Mayor Edward Murray is looking for four new members to serve on the Landmark Preservation Board in the following positions: Historian, Structural Engineer, Finance, and Real Estate.

The 12-member Landmark Preservation Board makes recommendations to the Seattle City Council for landmark designation and reviews all proposed physical alterations to designated features of landmark properties.

The Board is composed of two architects; two historians; one structural engineer; one representative each from the fields of urban planning, real estate, and finance; a Get Engaged member (a position for adults ages 18-29), and three members at-large. All appointments are made by the Mayor, subject to City Council confirmation.

Board meetings are held on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 3:30 p.m. The Architect and Historian board members also serve on the Board’s Architectural Review Committee (ARC). In general, Board members must commit approximately 10 hours per month to Landmark Board business.

Interested applicants must be Seattle residents, and Board members serve without compensation. Those interested in being considered should send a letter of interest and resume by Friday, June 10. Electronic submissions are preferred, if possible.

Please email your letter and resume to: Erin.Doherty@seattle.gov
(reference the Landmarks Preservation Board in the subject line)

To submit a paper copy, please address: Erin Doherty, Landmark Preservation Board Coordinator, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, PO Box 94649, Seattle, WA 98124-4649. For more information, contact Erin Doherty at (206) 684-0380.

The City of Seattle is committed to promoting diversity in the city’s boards and commissions. Women, persons with disabilities, sexual and gender minorities, young persons, senior citizens, persons of color, and immigrants are encouraged to apply.

Art Brightens Up Windows of Historic Lincoln Reservoir Gate House

Installation of art at the Lincoln Reservoir Gate House

Installation of art at the Lincoln Reservoir Gate House

Washington Middle School students at work on the project

Washington Middle School students at work on the project

The historic Lincoln Reservoir Gate House at Cal Anderson Park just got a lot more colorful. Fourteen original temporary artworks created by nine Washington Middle School students now grace the windows of the gate house and feature images inspired by the four seasons.

The project, titled Seasons All Around, is a collaboration between the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture, Seattle Parks and Recreation’s Out of School Time program at Washington Middle School, Seattle Public Utilities, and our own Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Historic Preservation Program. Students worked with teaching artist Nate Herth over 15 weeks to design and create the 14 original paintings, which reflect on the park and the vibrancy of Seattle. The classes took place at Washington Middle School and the students, representing the many races and ethnicities of Seattle, drew upon their varied prior experience with art, color, and Seattle’s neighborhoods to create this public art installation.

Our Historic Preservation program was involved in this project as the Lincoln Reservoir and adjoining Bobby Morris Playfield were designated as a Seattle Landmark in November 1998. The reservoir, built after the Great Seattle Fire of 1889, was put to use in 1901. In 2000 the reservoir was taken out of service and replaced by underground tanks, but the gate house remains. The park reopened in 2005 with four additional acres of useable open space.


This Sunday, May 22 from 11 a.m. to noon you can join the students, teaching artist Nate Herth, and City departments as we host an opening celebration of the temporary artworks.

Seeking Volunteers for North Seattle College Standing Advisory Committee

North Seattle College Health Sciences and Student Resources Building

North Seattle College Health Sciences and Student Resources Building

Do you live in North Seattle and have an interest in serving on a committee that advises on the development plans of the North Seattle College?

Our Major Institutions and Schools Program, which provides a way for neighbors of Seattle’s hospitals, universities, and colleges to be directly involved in the development plans for those institutions, is currently seeking interested community members to participate on the North Seattle College Standing Advisory Committee.

This committee provides feedback on projects planned and under development by the college to ensure it complies with its Master Plan. The Master Plan describes zoning rules, long range planning of the property, and transportation planning.

If you live in North Seattle and have experience in neighborhood organizing and issues, land use and zoning, architecture or landscape architecture, economic development, building development, educational services, or just an interest in your neighborhood’s future, we highly encourage you to apply.

The committee meets at North Seattle College one to four times a year. Committee members serve a two-year renewable term. If you are interested in serving on this committee, send a letter of interest via e-mail or regular mail by Tuesday, May 31 to Maureen Sheehan at:

E-mail: Maureen.Sheehan@seattle.gov

Mailing Address:
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
P.O. Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124-4649

For more information contact Maureen Sheehan, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, at 206-684-0302.

The City of Seattle is committed to promoting diversity in its boards and committees; women, young adults, senior citizens, persons with disabilities, sexual and gender minorities, persons of color, and immigrants are highly encouraged to apply.

Picardo Farm P-Patch Plots Available

Picardo P-PatchWe have available plots now and during the summer in the fabulous Picardo Farm P-Patch in northeast Seattle.This P-Patch is the oldest and biggest in the city and is rumored to have Seattle’s “best soil!”

You can grow fresh produce for yourself and your family while learning great gardening techniques from your neighbors.

If you are interested in signing up for a plot, contact Rich Macdonald at rich.macdonald@seattle.gov or call 206-386-0088.

Visit our website to learn more about the Picardo Farm P-Patch.