Advancing Equitable Outreach and Engagement

Message from Kathy Nyland, Director

Mayor Murray recently issued an Executive Order directing the city to approach outreach and engagement in an equitable manner. Putting an equity lens on our approaches is bold and, yes, brave. It shows a commitment to practices that address accessibility and equity.


What does this mean?

  • We often hear that meetings can feel like we are “checking a box.” The Mayor’s action means we can create processes that are more relationship-based and build authentic partnerships.
  • It means that we can create plans that are culturally sensitive, which includes an emphasis on translated materials.
  • It means we broaden access points, identify obstacles and turn them into opportunities.


What else does this mean?

  • It means we have an opportunity to recreate, re-envision and reconcile many lingering issues, including defining the difference between neighborhoods and communities, providing clarity about roles, and creating a system of engagement that builds partnerships with, and between, communities throughout the city of Seattle.
  • It means that we will be working to expand choices and opportunities for community members throughout this city, recognizing a special responsibility to plan for the needs of those who face barriers to participation.
  • It means that we’ll work with city offices and departments on community involvement to ensure that they are effective and efficient through the wise use and management of all resources, including the community’s time.
  • And it means we will expand the toolbox and make some investments in digital engagement.

 

Seattle is a unique city, and we are fortunate to have so many valuable partners currently at the proverbial table. Those partners play an important role and that role will continue. While we are appreciative of the countless hours our volunteers spend making our city better, we recognize and acknowledge there are barriers to participation. There are communities who cannot be at the table, while there are some communities who don’t even know there is a table. This is where the Department of Neighborhoods comes in.

This is not a power grab. It is a power share. At the heart of this Executive Order is a commitment to advance the effective deployment of equitable and inclusive community engagement strategies across all city departments. This is about making information and opportunities for participation more accessible to communities throughout the city.

 

“This is not about silencing voices. It’s the exact opposite. It’s about bringing more people into the conversations or at least creating opportunities for people to participate so they can be heard.”

 
Face-to-face meetings are incredibly important and those are not going away. But not every person can attend a community meeting, and the ability to do so should not determine who gets to participate and who gets to be heard.

We’d love to hear what tools YOU need to be successful and how WE can help you. Share your ideas with us:

  • Send an email to NewDON@seattle.gov.
  • Share your comments below.
  • Contact us at 206-684-0464 or mail us at P.O. Box 94649, Seattle, WA 98124-4649.
  • Join and follow the conversation online using #AdvancingEquitySEA at:

Facebook – @SeattleNeighborhoods
Twitter – @SeaNeighborhood

This is about making things easier and less exhaustive. This is about connecting communities to government and to one another. This is about moving forward.

Kathy Nyland, Director
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods

Learn How to Get Funds for Your Neighborhood Project

Small & Simple Projects FundOur Neighborhood Matching Fund program is hosting workshops for community groups interested in learning about the city’s popular Small and Simple Projects Fund. The Small and Simple Projects Fund provides matching awards of up to $25,000 to neighborhood groups for community-building projects such as cultural festivals, facility improvements, public art, and youth activities. These workshops will provide opportunities for you to:

  • Get an overview of our Small and Simple Projects Fund.
  • Find out how to get up to $25,000 for your community project.
  • Learn how to create a successful application.

 

WORKSHOP DATES & TIMES

  • August 4; 6 – 8pm at Montlake Community Center, 1618 East Calhoun St.
  • August 9; 6 – 8pm at El Centro Del La Raza, 2524 16th Avenue S.
  • August 18; 6 – 8pm at Phinney Neighborhood Center, 6532 Phinney Ave. N.

To RSVP, call 206-233-0093 or go online at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/H2PWPFY.

 

To learn more about the Fund, visit our website. The deadline for applications is Monday, September 12 at 5pm. All applicants must register in advance in the City of Seattle Webgrants system prior to completing an application.

The Neighborhood Matching Fund (NMF) Program awards matching funds for projects initiated, planned, and implemented by community members. Its goal is to build stronger and healthier neighborhoods through community involvement and engagement. Every award is matched by a neighborhood’s contribution of volunteer labor, donated materials, in-kind professional services, or cash.

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Seeks Facilitators for Civic Leadership Development Program

People's Academy for Community EngagementSeattle Department of Neighborhoods is seeking experienced facilitators to lead sessions for its leadership development program People’s Academy for Community Engagement, also known as PACE.

The presenters need to be experienced educators, trainers, or facilitators with a high degree of knowledge and experience in one or more of the following topics:

  • Approaches to Leadership: Community & Government
  • Government 101: Structure and Budget
  • Community Organizing
  • Inclusive Outreach & Public Engagement
  • Meeting Facilitation
  • Public Speaking
  • Sustaining Involvement: Self-Care and Mentoring
  • Land Use and Zoning

The facilitators will present for one hour to PACE students at the Fall (September – November), Winter (January-February), and/or Spring (March – July) Cohorts. The facilitator will also need to attend an orientation at Seattle City Hall. The Request for Qualifications (RFQ) can be found here and the deadline for submittal is Friday, August 12 for the Fall Cohort, but will continue taking RFQs for the cohorts next winter and spring. For more information contact PACE@seattle.gov.

PACE is a civic leadership development program dedicated to teaching hands-on engagement and empowerment skills to emerging leaders in a multicultural environment. The class is designed for 25-30 emerging leaders who are newly engaged in the community and want to acquire additional skills to be more effective in civic leadership. To learn more about PACE visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/programs-and-services/peoples-academy-for-community-engagement.

City of Seattle Now Accepting Applications for Seattle Youth Commission

Seattle Youth CommissionThe City of Seattle is now accepting applications for the Seattle Youth Commission (SYC), a commission of 15 Seattle residents ages 13-19 that address issues of importance to youth. Appointed by the Mayor and Seattle City Council, youth serving on this commission get a unique opportunity to work with elected officials, city staff, community leaders, and young people citywide to make positive changes in their communities through policy, organizing, and events. The deadline to apply is Friday, August 5 at 5:00 p.m.

Youth serving on the commission will be required to attend a half-day retreat on Saturday, September 24, bi-monthly SYC meetings, and additional committee commitments.  The commission meets the 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of each month at Seattle City Hall from 4:00 – 6:00 p.m. Commissioners will serve a two-year term beginning in September 2016 and ending June 2018.

In addition to representing youth across the city, commissioners receive hands-on experience in the public sector and learn how to cultivate the youth voice in city policy.

“Participating in the Seattle Youth Council was integral to my secondary education. It sparked a fire in me for community engagement and continues to impact my career aspirations.” – Lily Clifton, SYC member (2008-2010)

To apply, visit www.seattle.gov/seattle-youth-commission or print and complete this application and mail to:

Jenny Frankl
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
PO Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124-4649

Completed paper applications can also be turned in at the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods office in Seattle City Hall (600 4th Avenue) on the 4th floor.

For questions, contact jenny.frankl@seattle.gov or call 206-233-2044.

Neighbors Invited to Roxhill/Westwood Find It, Fix It Community Walk

Find It, Fix It Community WalkPlease join Mayor Murray and city leaders on Monday, July 25 in the Roxhill/Westwood neighborhood for our third Find It, Fix It Community Walk. These walks provide a unique opportunity for community members to identify neighborhood needs and discuss challenges directly with City leadership.

 

Roxhill/Westwood Find It, Fix It Community Walk
Monday, July 25, 2016
Sign-in and refreshments provided by Starbucks from 6:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Program and walk from 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Meet at the Longfellow Creek P-Patch at SW Thistle St & 25th Ave SW

Schedule
6:00 p.m. – 6:30p.m.

  • Sign-in and refreshments at the Longfellow Creek P-Patch

6:30 p.m. – 6:45 p.m.

  • Welcome remarks from Mayor Ed Murray

6:45 p.m. – 7:55 p.m.

7:55pm – 8:00 p.m.

  • Walk concludes at Roxhill Park
  • Department representatives and City staff available for follow-up questions

 

In partnership with Cities of Service, the City will offer up to $5,000 in grants for community-led projects to each 2016 Find It, Fix It Walk neighborhood. The Roxhill/Westwood Community Project Grant Application is available in seven languages at www.seattle.gov/finditfixit until Wednesday, August 3. If you have an idea for a project in Roxhill/Westwood, please apply today!

Participants can also use the Find It, Fix It mobile app on the walk. This smartphone app offers mobile users one more way to report selected issues to the City. Make sure to download the app before the walk.

For more information on the Find It, Fix It Community Walks program, please contact Laura Jenkins at 206.233.5166 or laura.jenkins@seattle.gov or visit www.seattle.gov/finditfixit.

People’s Academy for Community Engagement Now Accepting Applications

People's Academy for Community EngagementSeattle Department of Neighborhoods is accepting applications to the People’s Academy for Community Engagement (PACE), our civic leadership development program for the next wave of community leaders. The fall session begins September 27 and runs through December 6.

During the 10-week program, 25-30 emerging leaders (18 years and up) will learn hands-on strategies for community building, accessing government, and inclusive engagement from experts in the field. PACE has a strong focus on Seattle’s community and neighborhood organizations and the city’s governmental structure and processes.

Fall sessions will be held on Tuesday evenings from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. at Miller Community Center. Topics include: Approaches to Leadership, Government 101, Community Organizing, Inclusive Outreach and Public Engagement, Meeting Facilitation, Public Speaking, Conflict Resolution, and Sustaining Involvement.

Tuition for the 10-week program is $100. Tuition assistance is available. To apply, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/programs-and-services/peoples-academy-for-community-engagement/pace-application. The application deadline is Friday, August 12 at 5:00 p.m.

Given the popularity of the program, PACE will be offered three times a year: winter, spring and fall. The winter session will begin in January of 2017. For more information, visit our webpage and for questions, email PACE@seattle.gov.

Roxhill and Westwood Neighbors: Help Plan Your Find It, Fix It Community Walk

Find It, Fix It Community Walk

Aurora/Licton Springs Community Walk – May 2016

Roxhill and Westwood neighbors are invited to help plan the Roxhill/Westwood Find It, Fix It Community Walk, the third of seven Mayor-led walks happening this year. Find It, Fix It Community Walks bring together City officials, business owners, and community members to address neighborhood needs.

The Roxhill/Westwood walk will be held on Monday, July 25 from 6:30 – 8:00pm and will follow a route determined by community members serving on its Community Walk Action Team. If you are interested in serving on this team, contact Find It, Fix It Program Coordinator Laura Jenkins at laura.jenkins@seattle.gov or 206.233.5166.

In addition, Roxhill/Westwood community members are invited to apply for up to $5,000 to complete community projects that improve the safety or appearance of their neighborhood. To apply for a Community Project Grant, community members can find the application at seattle.gov/finditfixit beginning Monday, July 18 through Wednesday, August 3.

Lastly, community members don’t have to wait for the walk to report safety needs or city maintenance issues. They can use the Find It, Fix It mobile app. Android users can download the app from the Google Play Store and iPhone users can download it from the App Store.

High Point and NewHolly Farm Stands Open This Week

Market Garden Farm StandFor fresh organic produce look no further than the High Point and NewHolly Farm Stands opening for the season this week. The farm stands offer produce picked right from the P-Patch market gardens and grown by low-income residents of the High Point and NewHolly Seattle Housing Authority (SHA) neighborhoods. The hours of operation are 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

  • High Point Farm Stand (32nd SW and SW Juneau Street) open Wednesdays from June 29 to September 28.
  • NewHolly Farm Stand (S. Holly Park Dr. between 40th S. and Rockery Dr. S.) open Fridays from July 1 to September 30.

Both farm stands accept EBT cards and participate in Fresh Bucks which doubles consumers’ first $10 spent on the card. Come see the gardens, meet the farmers, and enjoy their fresh produce.

The High Point Farm Stand will again host ROAR, the mobile farm stand that sells produce to neighborhoods with limited access to healthy food. The food is grown by local farmers across Puget Sound.

Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens is a program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods P-Patch Community Gardening Program to support low-income gardeners and their neighborhoods. Its mission is to establish safe, healthy communities and economic opportunity through Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and farm stand enterprises. To learn more, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/p-patch-community-gardening/market-gardens.

CSA Subscriptions Available from Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens

Seattle P-Patch Market GardensYou can receive up to 18 weeks of high quality, farm-fresh, organic produce when you subscribe to the Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens CSA (community-supported agriculture). Each week subscribers will receive up to 15 items of organic seasonal produce grown at the NewHolly and High Point Seattle Market Gardens, a Seattle Department of Neighborhoods program that helps to establish healthy communities and economic opportunity in low-income neighborhoods.

The cost ranges from $15 to $25 a week based on the size of the share with prorated shares available. Two of the pick-up locations are located at the gardens where subscribers can meet the immigrant farmers and visit the site.

The pick-up locations, dates, and times are:

Thursday evenings, now through October 13 from 5:00-7:00 p.m. at:
High Point Market Garden (32nd Avenue SW and SW Juneau Street)
NewHolly Market Garden (42nd South and South Rockery Drive)

Saturdays, now through October 15 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at:
St. Andrews Episcopal Church (111 NE 80th Street)

Community members can subscribe now by completing and mailing an application (see form for address); or you can contact Michelle Jones at 206-372-6593 or Julie Bryan, P-Patch Garden Coordinator, at 206-684-0540.


Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens is a program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods P-Patch Community Gardening Program in collaboration with the Seattle Housing Authority and GROW to support low-income gardeners. Its mission is to establish safe, healthy communities and economic opportunity through Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and farm stand enterprises.

Join the Conversation on Housing Affordability & Livability

HALA Focus GroupIn the last five years, rents in Seattle have increased 35% and the homeless population is nearing 3,000.

“We are facing our worst housing affordability crisis in decades,” says Mayor Murray.“My vision is a city where people who work in Seattle can afford to live here.”

The Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda (HALA), is a set of strategies intended to address this crisis from all sides. The City is relying heavily on public input to take these strategies from ideas to practice and would love to hear from you.

The HALA Team has a cool online conversation called “Consider it” (https://hala.consider.it/) where you can weigh in alongside your neighbors and engage in dialogue around the City’s HALA proposals. When you go to the site, you’ll see a list of topics where you can view the proposals and read others’ comments. If you want to participate in the conversation, you’ll be prompted to create an easy log-in. The HALA team will be adding ideas to the site and looking for folks to return and check in as new topics are added. The City is committed to listening to the community and using the feedback it hears to shape the policies and practices of HALA.

This is civic engagement at work—join the conversation!