Join the Mayor’s Education Summit!

Mayor's Education SummitThe Mayor’s Education Summit Community Conversation series took place all over the city to collect ideas from students, parents, and advocates about how the City of Seattle can help improve educational opportunities for all children and youth in Seattle. The last Community Conversation is at the end of April. And then you are invited to the Mayor’s Education Summit where you’ll hear a summary of the top ideas and suggestions gathered during the two-month-long community conversation process.

The Mayor and education experts will present actions the City can take to reduce the education disparities among our children and close the achievement gap so all kids can succeed in school. “Perhaps the greatest challenge we face in addressing the opportunity gap is the persistent disparities in our public schools,” said Mayor Murray. “This is not just the responsibility of the Seattle school district. All of us have a responsibility to support the success of these students. These children are our children and we must not fail them.”

The last time the City convened an Education Summit was in 1990, when then Mayor Norm Rice established a deeper partnership between the City, Seattle Public Schools and education advocates. City residents came together to propose a new support for students and educators, the Families & Education Levy.

The Mayor’s Education Summit will take place on Saturday, April 30 at Garfield Community Center (2323 E Cherry St, Seattle, WA 98122).

Space is limited. Please RSVP today!

Volunteers Needed!

We are also seeking volunteers to help out with the Mayor’s Education Summit to be held at Garfield Community Center on Saturday, April 30, 2016. Volunteers will be needed largely for shifts between 8:30 am and 3:30 pm on April 30, as well as a few hours for setup on the Friday evening prior. If you’re interested in volunteering, please fill out this online Volunteer Sign-up Form, and we will contact you with additional information.

For more information about volunteering at the Summit, please contact Stacey Jehlik (stacey.jehlik@seattle.gov or 206.684.8266).

Save the Date! Youth Voice, Youth Choice Vote Week Begins in May

Youth Voice, Youth Choice meetingWhat would you do with $700,000 of Seattle’s City budget? Youth get to make that decision by participating in Youth Voice, Youth Choice Vote Week, May 21-29.

Youth Voice, Youth Choice is a new participatory budgeting initiative from the City of Seattle in which youth ages 11-25 democratically decide how to spend a portion of the City’s budget. After several months of collecting ideas from community members, and youth volunteers turning those ideas into proposals, we’re readying for the vote which will occur May 21-29. Youth will cast their vote for their favorite projects which range from park improvements to youth programs to arts funding.

If you live, work, or go to school in Seattle, are between the ages of 11-25, and want to make a difference in your community, cast your vote at an in-person polling site or vote online. The projects that receive the most votes will be funded by the City! Visit our webpage for more details on how to vote or to hold a polling site of your own.

 

Join Us for Livability Night Out at MOHAI!

LIVABILITY_INVITE_300x250_2You are invited to join Mayor Ed Murray and his team to learn and talk about what makes Seattle livable. Livability Night Out will be Tuesday, April 19 from 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. at the Museum of History and Industry (860 Terry Ave N).

The evening will begin with an open house where you’ll have a chance to discuss policies and proposals directly with City staff. After your questions get answered, you can enjoy Seattle’s history by visiting the rest of the museum. Then beginning at 7:15 p.m., Mayor Murray and Department Directors will present a lively update on how they see the vision of a vibrant Seattle coming through the programs they lead. The evening will finish with a Q & A with the Mayor.

Visit seattle.gov/HALA for more information on the event, as well as the Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda.

 

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods is Seeking AmeriCorps VISTA

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods is seeking an AmeriCorps VISTA member for a one-year opportunity to support the Mayor’s priority initiative to plan and implement neighborhood vitalization in low-income neighborhoods. Through Cities of Service’s City Hall AmeriCorps VISTA Program Grant, the AmeriCorps VISTA Member will focus on the Mayor’s Find It, Fix It Community Walks, a high-impact service strategy in which the Mayor and the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods engage community members in revitalizing their neighborhoods, one block at a time.

The VISTA Member will focus on using Community Walk planning and outreach to increase participation in city-based volunteer programs. This work will include designing strategies to recruit volunteers for city revitalization programs, leading community outreach efforts in neighborhoods selected for Community Walks, promoting and publicizing Community Walks, and developing impact metrics and outcome measurements for Community Walks.

Program Start/End Date:  June 13, 2016 – June 15, 2017

Accepting Applications Until: Friday, April 29, 2016

Applications Should Include:

  • Resume
  • Cover letter explaining your interest in service and, in particular, Mayor Murray’s Find It, Fix It Community Walk program
  • References (at least two, one professional and one personal)

Please Email Applications to:  jeanne.murphy@seattle.gov

Prior to submitting an application, please fully review the AmeriCorps VISTA position duties, qualifications, and benefits HERE.

To learn more about Find It, Fix It Community Walks, visit seattle.gov/finditfixit.

Join Mayor Murray for this Year’s Find It, Fix It Community Walks

find it fix it logoToday Mayor Ed Murray announced the schedule for his 2016 Find It, Fix It Community Walks to occur in seven neighborhoods this summer and fall. Now in its third year, the walks bring together City officials, business owners, and community members to address each neighborhood’s needs.

“These walks provide a unique opportunity for community members to identify neighborhood needs and discuss challenges directly with City leaders,” said Mayor Murray. “Together we invest in a spirit of engagement and community volunteerism. Find It, Fix It Community Walks are one way the City can support neighbors committed to improving their own communities. I look forward to working with community members this year to make these walks a success.”

This year’s Find It Fix It walks will be held in:

  • Aurora/Licton Springs – May 31
  • Belltown – Late June
  • Roxhill – July
  • Judkins Park – August
  • Crown Hill – September
  • Georgetown – October
  • Wallingford – Mid-November

Each walk will follow a route determined by community members on Community Walk Action Teams convened by the Department of Neighborhoods. Specific dates and locations will be announced two weeks prior to each walk.

If you are interested in becoming part of a Community Walk Action Team to help plan a walk in one of the seven neighborhoods, contact the Find It, Fix It Program Coordinator, Hilary Nichols, at hilary.nichols@seattle.gov, (206) 386.1907.

The City will continue to offer Community Project Grants for every walk, which provide up to $5,000 to support community-led revitalization and beautification projects. In 2015, 166 community volunteers, with assistance from City staff, completed 18 projects around the city. Projects included painting a mural on a public staircase in South Park, constructing a community kiosk in Cascade, and planting flowers in Hillman City.

Mayor Murray spearheaded the Find It, Fix It Community Walks in 2014 in partnership with Cities of Service, a national nonprofit that works with cities to provide support and training to encourage civic volunteerism.

Whether your neighborhood is part of this year’s walks or not, community members can report safety needs or city maintenance issues anytime with the Find It, Fix It mobile app. Android users can download the app from the Google Play Store and iPhone users can download it from the App Store.

Neighborhood Matching Fund Hosts April Workshops for Community Groups

Hopscotch projectThe Neighborhood Matching Fund (NMF), a program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, is hosting workshops for community groups interested in learning about the city’s popular Small and Simple Projects Fund. The Small and Simple Projects Fund provides matching awards of up to $25,000 to neighborhood groups for community-building projects such as cultural festivals, facility improvements, public art, and youth activities.

Each workshop provides an overview of the Neighborhood Matching Fund, the qualities of a good project, and the application process and requirements. To RSVP, call 206-733-9916 or go online at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/BWLYNJB.

The dates are:

  • Tuesday, April 12; 6 – 8 p.m. at Rainier Beach Community Center, 8825 Rainier Avenue S.
  • Thursday, April 28; 6 – 8 p.m. at Northgate Community Center, 10510 5th Avenue NE

To learn about the Fund, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/neighborhood-matching-fund/small-and-simple-projects-fund-. The deadline for applications is Monday, June 6 at 5:00 p.m., but make sure to register now to apply.

The Neighborhood Matching Fund (NMF) Program awards matching funds for projects initiated, planned, and implemented by community members. Its goal is to build stronger and healthier neighborhoods through community involvement and engagement. Every award is matched by a neighborhood’s contribution of volunteer labor, donated materials, in-kind professional services, or cash.

Your Last Chance to Attend a Workshop for the 2016 Large Projects Fund is Tonight!

Volunteers plantingSeattle Department of Neighborhoods’ Neighborhood Matching Fund is hosting its final workshop for those interested in applying to its Large Projects Fund tonight. The Large Projects Fund awards matching funds of up to $100,000 to neighborhood groups for community-building projects. Attendance at one of the workshops is required in order to submit a Large Projects Fund application.

The workshop will provide an overview of the Neighborhood Matching Fund, the qualities of a strong application, and the review process. Neighborhood and community groups interested in the fund are invited to attend. It will be held on Wednesday, April 6 from 6 – 8 p.m. at Laurelhurst Community Center (4554 NE 41st St). To attend the workshop, RSVP at surveymonkey.com/r/Largeprojects2016 or call us at 206-733-9916.

The deadline for the Large Projects Fund is May 2 at 5:00 p.m. To learn more, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/neighborhood-matching-fund/large-projects-fund.

The Neighborhood Matching Fund (NMF) Program awards matching funds for projects initiated, planned, and implemented by community members. Its goal is to build stronger and healthier neighborhoods through community involvement and engagement. Every award is matched by a neighborhood’s contribution of volunteer labor, donated materials, in-kind professional services, or cash.

 

Volunteers Needed! Join us for the Mayor’s Education Summit on April 30

Mayor's Education SummitThe Mayor’s Education Summit is a special event where the Mayor and education experts will present actions the City can take to reduce the education disparities among our children and close the achievement gap so all kids can succeed in school.The organizing committee is seeking volunteers to help out with the event for shifts between 8:30 am and 3:30 pm on April 30, as well as a few hours for setup on the Friday evening prior. If you’re interested in volunteering, please fill out this online Volunteer Sign-up Form (by Monday Apr. 18) and it will contact you with additional information.

For more information about volunteering at the Summit, please contact Stacey Jehlik (stacey.jehlik@seattle.gov or 206-684-8266).

Thank you for your interest in helping out!

Mayor Murray Announces $617,000 in Matching Funds for Neighborhood Projects

Volunteers plantingToday Mayor Ed Murray announced an investment of $617,102 in matching funds to support 31 neighborhood-initiated projects across the city. The awards are from the Neighborhood Matching Fund for a variety of arts events, physical improvements, and youth projects.

“These investments fund the work of the many community members who roll up their sleeves to create a more vibrant and inclusive city,” said Mayor Murray. “These projects include creative ways for people of all ages and walks of life to be involved. From hearing the personal histories of Yesler Terrace residents to helping to design a community crosswalk, we are partnering to improve neighborhoods across the city.”

These awards are part of the Small and Simple Projects Fund, one of three funds offered by Seattle Department of Neighborhoods. It provides cash awards of up to $25,000 in matching funds to community organizations committed to fostering and building a better community. The 2016 February awards range from $4,249 to $25,000, and the organizations pledge to match the City of Seattle’s $617,102 investment with $722,931 of locally raised money, donated materials, and volunteer labor.

“What makes the Neighborhood Matching Fund so successful is that dollars raised by community groups and their volunteer hours are leveraged with the help of the Fund,” said Kathy Nyland, director of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods. “Since 1988, it has meant that more than 5,000 community-led projects across the city have happened, and we’re all richer for it.”

In addition to the Small and Simple Projects Fund, the Neighborhood Matching Fund (NMF) has two other programs: the Large Projects Fund which provides matching funds of up to $100,000, and the Small Sparks Fund which provides funds of up to $1,000. Over its 28-year history, more than 5,000 projects have been funded with the help of NMF, and its investment in neighborhoods can be seen across the city. For more information about all of the funds visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/nmf/.

The Small and Simple Projects Fund has two more opportunities to apply this year in June and September. To learn more visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/nmf/smallandsimple.htm.

2016 Small and Simple Projects Fund February Awards

Citywide

$24,185 to Skate Like a Girl and Youth Employment Skateboarding to train and post 10 adult volunteer stewards at skate parks this summer and host a community celebration this fall. (Community match: $24,810)

$13,200 to Somali Health Board to survey the Somali community about health priorities and prepare a draft implementation plan to be shared for input via focus groups, roundtables, and forums. (Community match: $15,300)

$10,000 to Seattle Indian Health Board to complete a plaque and painted crosswalk, and host a healing ceremony to honor the life of Mr. John T. Williams, Native American carver. (Community match: $7,120)

$25,000 to the Tigrean Community Association to fix and upgrade the kitchen at the Tigrean Community Center and bring it up to health and safety codes. (Community match: $47,700)

$24,656 to Friends of STEM Technology to conduct a youth Science Technology Engineering and Math summer camp where youth will enhance their video skills. (Community match: $49,620)

District 1

$18,200 to Concord International Elementary PTA to lead a community design process for improvements to the school grounds to include trees, access to crosswalks, and rain gardens. (Community match: $16,213)

District 2

$22,436 to Friends of Detective Cookie Chess Park to plan and design an outdoor chess park and multi-functional community space. (Community match: $17,640)

$6,000 to Maple Elementary PTSA for playground improvements to include surface painting, art, and color enhancements. (Community match: $6,600)

$8,475 to Jefferson Mock-Trial Steering Committee to host outreach events to youth and provide the community with information about the judicial system, legal rights and issues. Youth will produce a video, attend competitions, and host informative community events. (Community match: $30,880)

$19,000 to Columbia City Business Association to involve 60 youth performers, provide mentoring, and offer the youth venues for live performances at the Columbia City BeatWalk (Community match: $11,600)

$25,000 to Hillman City Restorative Justice Committee to organize 12 free monthly workshops about restorative justice to help neighbors resolve conflict and strengthen community relationships. (Community match: $20,900)

$25,000 to Friends of Little Saigon to lead a community process to design and install decorative crosswalks at the intersection of S. Jackson Street and 12th Avenue S. (Community match: $25,000)

$19,445 to Southeast Seattle Senior Foundation to lead residents, community and staff through a process to imagine, design and select a long-term capital improvement plan for the exterior community spaces of Brighton Apartments. (Community match: $9,800)

$23,785 to The Passian Center for the Walk Away Day, a three-part event to bring youth together to make a decision to let go of something negative in their life. (Community match: $15,835)

$7,100 to Big-Brained Superheroes Club to expand and improve ongoing activities and include a series of STE(A)M concepts and activities. (Community match: $5,200)

$12,623 to North Beacon Hill Council to develop and conduct an inclusive online survey to residents regarding the impact of the 2035 Comprehensive plan, commitment to the 2010 Neighborhood Plan goals, and other topics. (Community match: $14, 112)

$25,000 to Friends of Japantown to revitalize and beautify its Nihonmachi Alley with public art, lighting, and programming opportunities. (Community match: $115,060)

District 3

$25,000 to Volunteer Park Trust to begin Phase II of the Volunteer Park Amphitheater Project which includes the concept design for a new performance stage. (Community match: $12,509)

$8,348 to Friends of Yesler Terrace to collect stories of former and current Yesler Terrace residents and create a reunion celebration, a series of community conversations, and a scrapbook of stories and photos. (Community match: $12,420)

$25,000 to Bego to organize the Little Ethiopia Music, Song and Dance Festival this summer to celebrate the Ethiopian community and the accomplishment of its business community. (Community match: $18,508)

District 5

$25,000 to Lake City Future First to organize a series of nine community conversations with dedicated local outreach to reach new and existing partners, especially under-represented voices. (Community match: $29,750)

$25,000 to Lake City Greenways Project to develop 60% construction drawings for a pocket park in the Olympic Hills neighborhood. (Community match: $15,713)

$25,000 to Friends of the Lake City Fred Meyer Garden Project to develop schematic design and construction drawings based on the conceptual design; and continue the work of fundraising, business outreach, artist engagement, and a robust public process. (Community match: $15,281)

District 6

$25,000 to Friends of Ballard Parklet to design, raise funds, and build Ballard’s first public parklet. (Community match: $43,800)

$20,400 to Bergen Place Activation Committee to produce free summer lunchtime concert series in Bergen Place Park. (Community match: $11,876)

District 7

$25,000 to the John Hay Foundation to conduct a community engagement process to design and develop upgrades to the school playground and play field areas. (Community match: $13,655)

$25,000 to Magnolia Chamber of Commerce to lead a community-based commercial revitalization effort which entails a preliminary retail assessment and community outreach. (Community match: $14,420)

$25,000 to Friends of Market to MOHAI Corridor to lead a community process to develop design standards for a pedestrian corridor from the waterfront to Lake Union along Bell Street and Terry Avenue. (Community match: $73,290)

$25,000 to Path with Art to organize the “We Are All Here” project in Pioneer Square to involve free workshops and a fall celebration to provide the public an opportunity to create art (painting, music, and poetry) and to spark dialogue in the community. (Community match: $61,420)

$25,000 to South Lake Union Community Council to complete final design of microparks along Westlake Avenue between Denny Way and Lake Union Park, plus finalize cost estimates and apply for construction permits. (Community match: $12,500)

$4,249 to Friends of Gilman Gardens to provide running water on site to the Gilman Gardens P-Patch community garden. (Community match: $4,400)