Landmarks Preservation Board to Consider Nomination of the Crescent-Hamm Building in West Seattle for Landmark Status

Crescent-Hamm Building crescent-hamm Seattle’s Landmarks Preservation Board will consider nomination of the Crescent-Hamm Building at 4302 SW Alaska Street/4559 California Avenue SW on Wednesday, January 4 at 3:30 p.m. The meeting will be held in Seattle City Hall (600 4th Avenue, Floor L2) in the Boards and Commissions Room L2-80.

The public is invited to attend the meeting and make comments. Written comments should be received by the Landmarks Preservation Board at the following mailing address by 3:00 p.m. on January 3, 2017:

Seattle Landmarks Preservation Board
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
PO Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124-4649

A copy of the Landmark Nomination is available for public review at the West Seattle Branch Library, 2306 42nd Avenue SW (206-684-7444), and the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods’ office in Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Avenue, 4th Floor (206-684-0228). It is also posted on the Department of Neighborhoods website under the heading of “Current Nominations,” or you can view it here.

Seattle City Council Approves Ordinances of Three Seattle Landmarks

Seattle City Council recently approved the landmark designation ordinances for three Seattle landmarks: Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Garfield Exchange in Queen Anne, Volunteer Park in Capitol Hill, and University Heights School in the University District. These icons join the more than 400 landmarks in the city that contribute to the cultural and architectural heritage of Seattle’s neighborhoods.

The City’s Landmarks Preservation Board approved the nomination, designation, and controls and incentives for all three landmarks, and staff provided the draft ordinances to the Seattle City Council. The final step in the process was approval by City Council which occurred on November 28.

The landmarks:

Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Garfield ExchangePacific Telephone & Telegraph Garfield Exchange (address: 1529 4th Avenue W)
Architect: PT&T Chief Engineer (name unknown)
Date Built: 1922 (addition in 1929)

 

 

Volunteer Park

Volunteer Park (1400 E. Prospect Street)
Landscape Architect: Olmsted Brothers
Date Built: 1909-10 (preceded by Reservoir, Gate House and Water Tower)

 

 

University HeightsUniversity Heights School, (5031 University Way NE)
Architect: Bebb & Mendel (1902) and James Stephen (addition)
Date Built: 1902, w/1908 addition

 

 

 

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Historic Preservation Program is responsible for the designation and protection of more than 400 historic structures, sites, objects, and vessels, as well as eight historic districts located throughout the city. For more information on the landmark designation process and to view other city landmarks, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/preservation/.

International Special Review District Board Announces Results of Annual Election

Chinatown - International District

Photo: Curtis Cronn

The annual election for the International Special Review District Board was held on Tuesday, November 15. Two positions were up for election this year, and the results are as follows:

  • Eliza Chan won Position #3 for a Business owner, Property owner or Employee.
  • Tiernan Martin won Position #5 for At-large.

Starting in December, Ms. Chan will begin her first term, and Mr. Martin will begin serving his second term.

The special character of the Chinatown International District is recognized and protected by city ordinance. In 1973, the International Special Review District Board was created to preserve, protect and enhance the cultural, economic and historical qualities of the District. The Board is composed of seven members — five elected by the Chinatown International District community and two appointed by the Mayor. Board members’ terms are for two years, and members may serve up to two consecutive terms.

The current board members are Stephanie Hsie, Carol Leong, Tiernan Martin (Vice-Chair), Miye Moriguchi (Chair), Herman Setijono, Valerie Tran, and Marie Wong. The terms for Mr. Martin and Ms. Wong end November 2016.

The International Special Review District is coordinated by the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Historic Preservation Program which is responsible for the designation and protection of more than 400 historic structures, sites, objects, and vessels, as well as eight historic districts located throughout the city.

Mayor Murray Signs 2017-2018 Budget: Exciting Changes for Department of Neighborhoods

Message from Kathy Nyland, Director of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods:

knyland-headshot1Yesterday Mayor Murray signed the 2017-18 City Budget that was adopted November 21, 2016 by Seattle City Council. The budget includes several additions and changes to the work of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods (DON), and I’m pleased to share them with you.

The department’s work has become much more important in the last year; and we see this work continuing and expanding as more issues come our way. We know everyone has a voice, and it is our job to hear them. The Mayor reminded us about the need for DON and the City Council has confirmed it.

When Mayor Murray issued the Executive Order in July mandating the City to approach outreach and engagement in a more equitable manner, it set the stage for this department to lead the City’s outreach and engagement practices. And through the Mayor’s Proposed Budget, he introduced legislation that outlined a new citywide framework for community engagement and redefined the role of DON in this work. This new legislation, Resolution 31718 and Council Bill 118834, does the following:

  • Advances a citywide approach to outreach and engagement that prioritizes equity and recognizes barriers to participation.
  • Demonstrates the City’s commitment to implementing equitable and inclusive community involvement strategies across all City Departments.
  • Directs City departments to develop well designed, responsive, and culturally relevant public involvement plans.
  • Creates a Community Involvement Commission to advise on City plans, policies, strategies, and community grant funding processes and make recommendations that advance equitable public engagement and civic participation.
  • Redefines the purpose of DON and the functions of the Director.


It is now up to DON to lead this work.
Going forward, you can depend on us to:

  • Focus on more access and more opportunity. We will broaden our reach and work with many groups knowing that no one speaks for all.
  • Implement a broad range of new initiatives and tools to encourage greater and more diverse participation. Read our workplan to learn more.
  • Work with city departments to ensure their outreach and engagement work is equitable and transparent through consultation and collaboration.

 

How are we going to do this? Here are DON’s budget highlights that will support this work:

POSITIONS

  • Two staff members to continue their work in outreach and engagement oversight and city-wide coordination.
  • Two positions to focus on improving the City’s outreach and engagement to neighborhoods during impactful construction projects.
  • Two positions to provide additional capacity to the POEL (Public Outreach and Engagement Liaison) program with a focus on low-income transit options.
  • One position to broaden the participatory budgeting approach to new audiences.
  • One position to analyze the outcomes of DON’s programs and identify strategies and opportunities for improvements.
  • One part-time position dedicated to Historic Preservation process improvements.
  • One position dedicated to administer grants and contracts.
  • One Accounting Technician position to serve the Department of Education and Early Learning.


FUNDING

  • Funds to develop resources and tools to support all community organizations. These would include workshops, online trainings, and a one-stop shop for resources.
  • Funds to develop a fellowship program to support community-based organizations that provide leadership development opportunities and capacity-building.
  • Funds to develop and implement community satisfaction surveys to gain residents’ opinions on city services and priorities for improvement.
  • Funds to support outreach efforts for the Housing Affordability Livability Agenda, including funds to review the city’s historic preservation program review process.

 

 

Several of you had questions about our Neighborhood District Coordinators. We continue working with them and their labor representatives to evolve their job descriptions to meet our new goals. Please know that there will be staff designated to assist community groups, both community-based and geography-based.

The DON staff is excited to implement this work. It gives us and the City an opportunity to rethink and reimagine how we interact with one another. Over the coming months, you will be introduced to the many tools, processes, and initiatives that DON will be leading, supporting, and implementing. Make sure to visit our Engage Seattle webpage to learn more.

Outreach and engagement is the core of what we do. Equity, transparency and “meeting people where they are” are our guiding principles. Our work is about fostering community partnerships, cultivating emerging leadership, and facilitating community inclusiveness. We are a department known for many programs; but we are about people, first and foremost. We are thankful that this adopted budget supports the good work we do and our mission of “strengthening Seattle by engaging all communities.”

Landmarks Preservation Board to Consider Nomination of Mama’s Mexican Kitchen for Landmark Status

Mama's Mexican Kitchen

Mama’s Mexican Kitchen (Photo: vmax137)

Seattle’s Landmarks Preservation Board will consider nomination of Mama’s Mexican Kitchen at 2234 2nd Avenue on Wednesday, December 7 at 3:30 p.m. in Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Avenue, in Room L280 – Board and Commissions (Floor L2).

The public is invited to attend the meeting and make comments. Written comments should be received by the Landmarks Preservation Board at the following mailing address by December 6 at 3:00 p.m.:

Seattle Landmarks Preservation Board
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
PO Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124-4649

A copy of the Landmark Nomination is available for public review at the Central Library (1000 4th Avenue) and the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods’ office in Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Avenue, 4th Floor (206-684-0228). It is also posted on the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods website, under the heading of Current Nominations.

To learn more about the city’s landmarks and the Landmarks Preservation Board, visit our website. Historic Preservation is a program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods.

Mayor Murray Seeks New Member for International Special Review District Board

Chinatown - International District

Photo: Curtis Cronn

Mayor Edward Murray invites community members to apply for an open position on the International Special Review District Board. The seven-member International Special Review District Board reviews façade alterations, signs, new construction, changes of use, and street improvements, and makes recommendations to the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods director for all properties within the International Special Review District. The goals of the board are to maintain architectural character, cultural heritage, social diversity, and through the use of historic preservation, enhance the economic climate in the International Special Review District.

The open position is one of two seats on the board that are filled by mayoral appointment. Individuals who have an architectural background and an interest in historic preservation and/or familiarity with the Chinatown/ International District are encouraged to apply.

Board meetings are held on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 4:30 p.m. for one to three hours. In addition, board members may be asked to serve on an additional committee as the Board deems appropriate. In general, Board members must commit approximately five to six hours per month to Board business.

The ISRD Board is made up of five elected members and two members who are appointed by the mayor and confirmed by Seattle City Council. The five elected members consist of:

  • Two members who own property in the Chinatown International District, or who own or are employed by businesses located in the Chinatown International District.
  • Two members who are either residents (including tenants) or persons with a recognized and demonstrated interest in the welfare of the Chinatown International District community.
  • One member-at-large.

Interested applicants must be Seattle residents. Board members serve without compensation. Those interested in being considered should send a letter of interest and resume by Monday, November 30, 2016. Electronic submissions are preferred, if possible.

Please email your letter and resume to: rebecca.frestedt@seattle.gov (reference the International Special Review District in the subject line). To submit a paper copy, please address:

Rebecca Frestedt
International Special Review District
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
P.O. Box 94649
Seattle, WA, 98124-4649

For more information, contact Rebecca Frestedt at (206) 684-0226.

The City of Seattle is committed to promoting diversity in the city’s boards and commissions. Women, persons with disabilities, sexual and gender minorities, young persons, senior citizens, persons of color, and immigrants are encouraged to apply.

The International Special Review District is coordinated by the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Historic Preservation Program.

Landmarks Preservation Board to Consider Nomination of the West Coast Printing Building for Landmark Status

West Cost Printing BuildingSeattle’s Landmarks Preservation Board will consider nomination of the West Coast Printing building at 622 Rainier Avenue S on Wednesday, November 16 at 3:30 p.m. in Seattle City Hall (600 4th Avenue, Floor L2) in the Boards and Commissions Room L2-80.

The public is invited to attend the meeting and make comments. Written comments should be received by the Landmarks Preservation Board at the following mailing address by November 15 at 3:00 p.m.:

Seattle Landmarks Preservation Board
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
PO Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124-4649

A copy of the Landmark Nomination is available for public review at the International District/Chinatown Branch Library (713 8th Avenue South) and the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods’ office in Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Avenue, 4th Floor (206-684-0228). It is also posted on the Department of Neighborhoods website under the heading of “Current Nominations.”

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Historic Preservation program manages the designation and protection of more than 400 historic structures, sites, objects, and vessels, as well as eight historic districts throughout Seattle.

City Council Approves Designation of Mount Baker Park Presbyterian Church as City’s Newest Landmark

Mount Baker Park Presbyterian ChurchMount Baker Park Presbyterian ChurchSeattle City Council recently approved a landmark designation ordinance for the Mount Baker Park Presbyterian Church building. Located in Seattle’s Mount Baker neighborhood, this building joins the more than 400 landmarks in the city that represent our rich cultural and architectural heritage.

The city’s Landmarks Preservation Board approved the nomination, designation, and controls and incentives for the Mount Baker Park Presbyterian Church, and provided the draft ordinance to the Seattle City Council. The final step in the process was approval by City Council which occurred on Monday, October 3, 2016.

The Mount Baker Park Presbyterian Church was built in 1925 and designed by Albertson, Richardson & Wilson. The building is located at 3201 Hunter Boulevard South.

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Historic Preservation Program is responsible for the designation and protection of more than 400 historic structures, sites, objects, and vessels, as well as eight historic districts located throughout the city. For more information on the landmark designation process and to view other city landmarks, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/preservation/.

Seattle City Council Approves Designation of Two Historic Landmarks on Capitol Hill

Gaslight Inn

Gaslight Inn

J.W. Bullock House

J.W. Bullock House

Seattle City Council approved landmark designation ordinances for the Gaslight Inn and the J.W. Bullock House. Located on Capitol Hill, these buildings join the more than 400 landmarks in the city that represent our rich cultural, historical, and architectural heritage. Both landmarks were nominated by the owners.

The city’s Landmarks Preservation Board approved the nomination, designation, and controls and incentives for these landmarks and provided the draft ordinances to the Seattle City Council. The final step in the process was approval by City Council which occurred on Monday, September 12.

The new landmarks:

  • Gaslight Inn built in 1904 (address: 1727 15th Avenue)
    • The architect is unknown
  • J.W. Bullock House built in 1912 (address: 1220 10th Avenue E)
    • Architect/Builder: Louis O. Menard

 

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Historic Preservation Program is responsible for the designation and protection of more than 400 historic structures, sites, objects, and vessels, as well as eight historic districts located throughout the city. For more information on the landmark designation process and to view other city landmarks, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/preservation/.

Seattle City Council approves designation of The Theodora as the City’s newest landmark

The TheodoraSeattle City Council recently approved a landmark designation ordinance for The Theodora building. Located in Ravenna, this building joins the more than 400 landmarks in the city that represent our rich cultural and architectural heritage.

The city’s Landmarks Preservation Board approved the nomination, designation, and controls and incentives for The Theodora, and provided the draft ordinance to the Seattle City Council. The final step in the process was approval by City Council which occurred on Monday, August 8.

The Theodora was built in 1965 and designed by Grant, Copeland & Chervenak. The building is located at 6559 35th Ave NE.

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Historic Preservation Program is responsible for the designation and protection of more than 400 historic structures, sites, objects, and vessels, as well as eight historic districts located throughout the city. For more information on the landmark designation process and to view other city landmarks, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/preservation/.