City of Seattle Awards $650,700 for Community-based Projects

BF Day Elementary School PlaygroundMayor Ed Murray and the Seattle City Council awarded seven Seattle organizations a total of $650,741 to support neighborhood-initiated projects across the city. The awards are part of the City’s Neighborhood Matching Fund, which provides more than $3 million each year to local organizations.

“Through the Neighborhood Matching Fund, thousands of community organizations have completed a variety of projects that have made a difference in their neighborhood and community,” said Mayor Murray.  “From a performance series in the Central Area, to an open space plaza in Eastlake, to digital storytelling in Chinatown International District – these funds help to acknowledge the dedication of community volunteers to make their ideas become realities.”

“These projects are inspirational examples of neighbors working together to improve the lives of others and the health of their communities. I heard from many of the recipients at my Council committee in August, and look forward to seeing Neighborhood Matching Fund dollars put to great use across the city.”
– Councilmember Tim Burgess (Position 8, Citywide)

The Large Projects Fund, a program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, provides awards of up to $100,000 to community organizations committed to fostering and building a better community. For this fund, two teams of community members from neighborhood districts selected the recipients through an extensive evaluation process. With the city’s investment of $650,741, these seven awardees will contribute $1,048,216 in locally raised money, donated materials and professional services and volunteer labor.

The Neighborhood Matching Fund (NMF) has two other funds: the Small and Simple Projects Fund which provides up to $25,000, and the Small Sparks Fund which provides up to $1,000 per project. For 28 years, more than 5,000 projects have been funded in partnership with the NMF Program, and its investment in neighborhoods can be seen across the city. For more information about all of the funds visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/nmf/.

 

2016 Large Projects Fund Awards

District 2

  • $100,000 to Mini Mart City Park to renovate a former gas station into a pocket park, arts center, and community gathering place in Georgetown. Community match: $265,010.
  • $100,000 to SouthEast Effective Development to build a professional broadcast studio for Rainier Valley Radio, a community production space, and other spaces to serve as a digital communications hub. Community match: $294,018.
  • $99,960 to the Beacon Food Forest for Phase II construction to include an outdoor educational space, additional P-Patch plots, a tool shed, and other improvements. Community match: $211,793.
  • $90,781 to OneAmerica to engage residents of Chinatown International District in digital storytelling through classes that teach English language and digital literacy skills. Community match: $47,345.

 

District 3

  • $60,000 to 206 Zulu to produce up to eight free public events while enabling Central District arts organizations free access to historic Washington Hall. Community match: $19,300.
  • $100,000 to The Friends of First Place Scholars to make facility improvements and plan for future repairs at the First Place School. Community match: $110,450.

 

District 4

  • $100,000 to Lake Union Neighbors to accomplish Phase I construction of an open space plaza in street right-of-way and complete a pedestrian corridor. Community match: $100,300.

Advancing Equitable Outreach and Engagement

Message from Kathy Nyland, Director

Mayor Murray recently issued an Executive Order directing the city to approach outreach and engagement in an equitable manner. Putting an equity lens on our approaches is bold and, yes, brave. It shows a commitment to practices that address accessibility and equity.


What does this mean?

  • We often hear that meetings can feel like we are “checking a box.” The Mayor’s action means we can create processes that are more relationship-based and build authentic partnerships.
  • It means that we can create plans that are culturally sensitive, which includes an emphasis on translated materials.
  • It means we broaden access points, identify obstacles and turn them into opportunities.


What else does this mean?

  • It means we have an opportunity to recreate, re-envision and reconcile many lingering issues, including defining the difference between neighborhoods and communities, providing clarity about roles, and creating a system of engagement that builds partnerships with, and between, communities throughout the city of Seattle.
  • It means that we will be working to expand choices and opportunities for community members throughout this city, recognizing a special responsibility to plan for the needs of those who face barriers to participation.
  • It means that we’ll work with city offices and departments on community involvement to ensure that they are effective and efficient through the wise use and management of all resources, including the community’s time.
  • And it means we will expand the toolbox and make some investments in digital engagement.

 

Seattle is a unique city, and we are fortunate to have so many valuable partners currently at the proverbial table. Those partners play an important role and that role will continue. While we are appreciative of the countless hours our volunteers spend making our city better, we recognize and acknowledge there are barriers to participation. There are communities who cannot be at the table, while there are some communities who don’t even know there is a table. This is where the Department of Neighborhoods comes in.

This is not a power grab. It is a power share. At the heart of this Executive Order is a commitment to advance the effective deployment of equitable and inclusive community engagement strategies across all city departments. This is about making information and opportunities for participation more accessible to communities throughout the city.

 

“This is not about silencing voices. It’s the exact opposite. It’s about bringing more people into the conversations or at least creating opportunities for people to participate so they can be heard.”

Face-to-face meetings are incredibly important and those are not going away. But not every person can attend a community meeting, and the ability to do so should not determine who gets to participate and who gets to be heard.

We’d love to hear what tools YOU need to be successful and how WE can help you. Share your ideas with us:

  • Send an email to NewDON@seattle.gov.
  • Share your comments below.
  • Contact us at 206-684-0464 or mail us at P.O. Box 94649, Seattle, WA 98124-4649.
  • Join and follow the conversation online using #AdvancingEquitySEA at:

Facebook – @SeattleNeighborhoods
Twitter – @SeaNeighborhood

This is about making things easier and less exhaustive. This is about connecting communities to government and to one another. This is about moving forward.

Kathy Nyland, Director
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods

People’s Academy for Community Engagement Now Accepting Applications

People's Academy for Community EngagementSeattle Department of Neighborhoods is accepting applications to the People’s Academy for Community Engagement (PACE), our civic leadership development program for the next wave of community leaders. The fall session begins September 27 and runs through December 6.

During the 10-week program, 25-30 emerging leaders (18 years and up) will learn hands-on strategies for community building, accessing government, and inclusive engagement from experts in the field. PACE has a strong focus on Seattle’s community and neighborhood organizations and the city’s governmental structure and processes.

Fall sessions will be held on Tuesday evenings from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. at Miller Community Center. Topics include: Approaches to Leadership, Government 101, Community Organizing, Inclusive Outreach and Public Engagement, Meeting Facilitation, Public Speaking, Conflict Resolution, and Sustaining Involvement.

Tuition for the 10-week program is $100. Tuition assistance is available. To apply, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/programs-and-services/peoples-academy-for-community-engagement/pace-application. The application deadline is Friday, August 12 at 5:00 p.m.

Given the popularity of the program, PACE will be offered three times a year: winter, spring and fall. The winter session will begin in January of 2017. For more information, visit our webpage and for questions, email PACE@seattle.gov.

Deadline Approaches for Matching Funds to Support your Neighborhood Project

Othello+Intl+music+nwlrSeptember 2 workshop for interested applicants
Application deadline is October 5

If your group needs funds to do a neighborhood project, our Neighborhood Matching Fund may be able to help. However, you’ll need to be quick because the application deadline for the Small and Simple Projects Fund is Monday, October 5 at 5:00 p.m. This fund provides awards of up to $25,000 to for community-building projects that are matched by community contributions.

To learn about the Small and Simple Projects Fund, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/nmf/smallandsimple.htm. This is the last opportunity in 2015 to apply to this fund.

The final workshop is scheduled for Wednesday, September 2 from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. at University Heights Community Center (Room 209), 5031 University Way NE. The workshop provides an overview of the Neighborhood Matching Fund, the qualities of a good project, and the application process and requirements. To RSVP, go online at surveymonkey.com/r/ZHM36BJ or call  206-233-0093. The workshop is open to all.

Our Neighborhood Matching Fund staff is available to advise groups on ways to develop successful applications and projects. You are strongly encouraged to call 206.233.0093 or email NMFund@seattle.gov to discuss your project idea with one of our project managers.

The Neighborhood Matching Fund (NMF) Program awards matching funds for projects initiated, planned, and implemented by community members. Its goal is to build stronger and healthier neighborhoods through community involvement and engagement. Every award is matched by a neighborhood’s contribution of volunteer labor, donated materials, in-kind professional services, or cash.

International Special Review District Board Announces Annual Election Results

– The annual election for the International Special Review District Board was held on Tuesday, November 18. Two positions were up for election this year and the results are as follows:

  • Stephanie Carrillo won Position #3 for a District business person, property owner or employee.
  • Marie Wong won Position #5 for an at-large seat.

Ms. Wong and Ms. Carrillo will begin their first elected terms starting in December. Ms. Wong is currently serving as a Mayoral appointee, filling a vacancy in position #3.

The special character of the Chinatown International District is recognized and protected by city ordinance.  In 1973, the International Special Review District Board was created to preserve, protect and enhance the cultural, economic and historical qualities of the District. The Board is composed of seven members — five elected by the Chinatown International District community and two appointed by the Mayor.  Board members’ terms are for two years, and members may serve up to two consecutive terms.

The current board members are Candace Chin, Ben Grace, Carol Leong, Miye Moriguchi, Martha Rogers, Joann Ware and Marie Wong. Ms. Chin is an outgoing member.

The International Special Review District is coordinated by the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Historic Preservation Program which is responsible for the designation and protection of more than 400 historic structures, sites, objects, and vessels, as well as eight historic districts located throughout the city.

You are Invited to Celebrate Carlos Bulosan’s 100th Birthday!

bolusan posterAll are invited to a series of free events this month to commemorate Filipino American history and the anniversary of Carlos Bulosan’s 100th birthday. Building off of the permanent Carlos Bulosan exhibit at the Eastern Hotel in the Chinatown/International District, the events share Bulosan’s history, artistic work, and impact even today on contemporary social justice issues. The Neighborhood Matching Fund is pleased to support this project.

As a radical labor organizer and author of the book “America is in the Heart,” Bulosan set the groundwork for Seattle’s rich history of labor activism and community organizing, from the Alaskeros and ILWU Local 37 activists to the fight for community preservation in the Chinatown/International District. The organizing committee aims to connect the events of the past with today’s civil rights, immigration, and labor movements.

All events are free and open to everyone! For more information, contact Derek Dizon at carlosbulosan100@gmail.com or (206) 353-5062. Here is a list of upcoming events:

Thursday November 13
Film “Delano Manongs” by Marissa Aroy
6:00PM
Location: UW Location: Ethnic Cultural Theater, 3931 Brooklyn Ave NE, Seattle

Friday November 14
Conference: “Empire is in the Heart”
9:30AM-5:00PM
Location: University of Washington Husky Union Building (HUB) Room 145

UW Carlos Bulosan Special Collections Exhibit and Reception
5:00PM-7:00PM
Location: University of Washington Husky Union Building (HUB) Room 145

Talambuhay: Our Stories, Our People
6:00PM – 9:00PM
Location: Filipino Community of Seattle, 5740 Martin Luther King Jr Way, Seattle

Saturday, November 15
Filipino American Historical Tour in the Chinatown International District
10:00AM-12:00PM
Location: Meet at Wing Luke Museum, 719 S King St, Seattle

Tour of the Carlos Bulosan Exhibit at the Eastern Hotel
12:00PM-2:00PM
Location: Carlos Bulosan Memorial Exhibit, 506 Maynard Ave S, Seattle

Staged Reading of Carlos Bulosan’s “The Romance of Magno Rubio
3:00PM-6:30PM
Location: Massive Monkees Studio, 662 S King St, Seattle

Sunday, November 16
Film Screenings of Lav Diaz Film, “Norte, the End of History”
3:30pm
Location: Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave, Seattle

Monday November 17, 2014
Film Screening of Anthony Chen Film, “Ilo Ilo”
7:00PM
Location: Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave, Seattle

International Special Review District Board Announces Candidates for Annual Election

The 2014 International Special Review District (ISRD) Board election will be held Tuesday, November 18 from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. at the Bush Asia Hotel, 409 Maynard Avenue South, in the basement level conference room.

Two board positions are up for election:

  • Position #3 for a Business Owner, Property Owner or Employee
  • Position #5 for At-Large

Nominations closed Tuesday, October 21. Two candidates were nominated, and candidate information is provided below for each position. Brief candidate biographies will be available at the polling place on the day of the election.

One candidate is seeking Position #3 for a Business Owner, Property Owner or Employee

Stephanie Carrillo is the manager of a residential property within the Chinatown International District. She is also on the board of the Chinatown International District Business Improvement Area (CIDBIA) and is a member of the neighborhood’s Only in Seattle Marketing Committee. She has worked in the neighborhood for four years and volunteered her time on many different boards and committees.

One candidate is seeking Position #5 for an At-Large member

Marie Wongis an Associate Professor at Seattle University where she teaches courses in Urban Planning, Housing and Sustainability and Asian American History and Community Development. She’s served on boards and committees in the Chinatown International District since 1989, including exhibit committees with the Wing Luke Museum and five years of service on the board of InterIm Community Development Association.  She currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Kong Yick Investment Company. In September of this year, Ms. Wong was appointed by Mayor Murray to fill a vacant seat (position #3) on the ISRD Board. That term expires in November.   

The special character of the Chinatown International District is recognized and protected by City Ordinance. In 1973, the International Special Review District Board was created to preserve, protect, and enhance the cultural, economic, and historical qualities of the District. The Board is made up of seven members – five elected by the Chinatown International District community and two appointed by the Mayor.  Board members’ terms are for two years and members may serve up to two consecutive terms. To learn more about the election and the International Special Review District please visit http://seattle.gov/neighborhoods/preservation/id.htm/.

The current board members are Candace Chin, Ben Grace (Vice Chair), Carol Leong, Miye Moriguchi, Martha Rogers (Chair), Joann Ware, and Marie Wong. The terms for Mss. Chin and Wong end in November 2014.

Neighbors invited to International District ‘Find It, Fix It’ Community Walk

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray’s ‘Find It, Fix It’ Community Walk, focused on several crime hotspots, makes its way to Seattle’s International District on Thursday, Sept. 11. This is the seventh walk hosted by the mayor in neighborhoods around the city.

At the events, community residents, police, and city officials walk together to identify physical disorder and solve it. As a result of these walks, Seattle City Light, the Seattle Department of Transportation, the Department of Planning and Development, and Seattle Public Utilities have worked – and continue to work – to make improvements in Seattle’s neighborhoods. Watch videos, view photos and read actions taken as a result of these walks at: http://murray.seattle.gov/finditfixit

International District Find It, Fix It Community Walk: Thursday, Sept. 11, 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
S. King St. and Maynard Ave. S.
Meet at Hing Hay Park (Map)

6:00 – 6:15 p.m.

Short program featuring Mayor Ed Murray, City Councilmember Bruce Harrell, Seattle Chief of Police Kathleen O’Toole, and department representatives.

6:15 – 7:30 p.m.

Walk commences along the following route:

  • West on S. King St.
  • North on 5th Ave. S.
  • East on S. Jackson St.
  • South on 12th Ave. S.
  • West on S. King St.

7:30 p.m.

Walk concludes and department representatives are available for follow-up questions.

Another ‘Find It, Fix It’ walk is scheduled for Sept. 17th on Capitol Hill.

For more information on Murray’s public safety strategy for Seattle, visit http://www.seattle.gov/mayor/public-safety-strategy-for-seattle.

 

International Special Review District Board Announces Annual Election Results

The annual election for the International Special Review District Board was held on Tuesday, November 19. Three positions were up for election this year and the results are as follows:

  • Joann Ware won Position #1 for a District business person, property owner or employee. 
  • Ben Grace won Position #2 for a resident, tenant, or community participant.
  • Carol Leong won Position #4 for a resident, tenant or community participant.

Ms. Ware will begin serving a second term, and new Board members Mr. Grace and Ms. Leong will begin their terms starting in December.                                                                                                                         

The special character of the Chinatown International District is recognized and protected by city ordinance.  In 1973, the International Special Review District Board was created to preserve, protect and enhance the cultural, economic and historical qualities of the District. The Board is composed of seven members — five elected by the Chinatown International District community and two appointed by the Mayor. Board members’ terms are for two years, and members may serve up to two consecutive terms.

The current board members are Candace Chin, Ben Grace, Carol Leong, Miye Moriguchi, Martha Rogers, and Joann Ware. There is a current vacancy. Outgoing board members are Ching Chan and Marvin Rosete.

The International Special Review District is coordinated by the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Historic Preservation Program which is responsible for the designation and protection of more than 400 historic structures, sites, objects, and vessels, as well as eight historic districts located throughout the city.

 

International Special Review District Board announces candidates for annual election

The 2013 International Special Review District (ISRD) Board election will be held Tuesday, November 19 from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. at the Bush Asia Hotel, 409 Maynard Avenue South, in the basement level conference room.

Three board positions are up for election:

  • Position #1 for a Business Owner, Property Owner or Employee
  • Position #2 for a Resident, Tenant or Community Participant
  • Position #4 for Resident, Tenant or Community Participant

Nominations closed Tuesday, October 22. Three candidates were nominated, and candidate information is provided below for each position. Brief candidate biographies will be available at the polling place on the day of the election.

Two candidates are seeking Position #1 for a Business Owner, Property Owner or Employee

Tim Lee is a property owner within the Chinatown International District. He is also a member of the Seattle Chinese Chamber of Commerce, the Bellevue Chinese Chamber of Commerce, and the Lion’s Club. He is a retired state employee and is interested in applying his experience working for government and small businesses to his involvement in the Chinatown International District community.

Joann Ware works for Interim CDA on community-based design projects and affordable housing. Joann is a current ISRD Board member with a deep commitment to the neighborhood.  She has a strong interest in the built environment and would like to continue using her architectural knowledge to serve the community and the Board.

 

One candidate is seeking Position #2 for a Resident, Tenant or Community Participant

Ben Grace is actively involved with the Chinatown International District through his work on the Chinatown Historical Alley Project and is a frequent contributor to community events through the neighborhood. Earlier this year, Ben led the project to translate street signs in Chinatown and Japantown (Nihonmachi). Ben is also a tenant, as an employee of the Chinatown International District Business Improvement Area (CIDBIA).

One candidate is seeking Position #4 for a Resident, Tenant or Community Participant

Carol Leong is part of the third generation of her family to live, work, or volunteer in the Chinatown International District. She has participated in the Seattle Chinese Athletic Association (SCAA) and the Seattle Chinese Community Girls Drill Team. For the past 15 years she has served as the volunteer coordinator of Sifu David F. Leong’s NW Kung Fu and Fitness, where she has participated in the Chinatown Parade and served as a scholarship coordinator and youth mentor. Carol is also involved with the neighborhood Block Watch and participates in numerous community events.

The special character of the Chinatown International District is recognized and protected by City Ordinance.  In 1973, the International Special Review District Board was created to preserve, protect, and enhance the cultural, economic, and historical qualities of the District. The Board is made up of seven members – five elected by the International District community and two appointed by the Mayor.  Board members’ terms are for two years and members may serve up to two consecutive terms. To learn more about the election and the International Special Review District visit http://seattle.gov/neighborhoods/preservation/id.htm/.

The current board members are Ching Chan, Candace Chin, Sue-May Eng, Miye Moriguchi, Martha Rogers, Marvin Rosete (Chair), and Joann Ware. The terms for Mr. Rosete and Mss. Chan and Ware will end in November 2013.