Advancing Equitable Outreach and Engagement

Message from Kathy Nyland, Director

Mayor Murray recently issued an Executive Order directing the city to approach outreach and engagement in an equitable manner. Putting an equity lens on our approaches is bold and, yes, brave. It shows a commitment to practices that address accessibility and equity.


What does this mean?

  • We often hear that meetings can feel like we are “checking a box.” The Mayor’s action means we can create processes that are more relationship-based and build authentic partnerships.
  • It means that we can create plans that are culturally sensitive, which includes an emphasis on translated materials.
  • It means we broaden access points, identify obstacles and turn them into opportunities.


What else does this mean?

  • It means we have an opportunity to recreate, re-envision and reconcile many lingering issues, including defining the difference between neighborhoods and communities, providing clarity about roles, and creating a system of engagement that builds partnerships with, and between, communities throughout the city of Seattle.
  • It means that we will be working to expand choices and opportunities for community members throughout this city, recognizing a special responsibility to plan for the needs of those who face barriers to participation.
  • It means that we’ll work with city offices and departments on community involvement to ensure that they are effective and efficient through the wise use and management of all resources, including the community’s time.
  • And it means we will expand the toolbox and make some investments in digital engagement.

 

Seattle is a unique city, and we are fortunate to have so many valuable partners currently at the proverbial table. Those partners play an important role and that role will continue. While we are appreciative of the countless hours our volunteers spend making our city better, we recognize and acknowledge there are barriers to participation. There are communities who cannot be at the table, while there are some communities who don’t even know there is a table. This is where the Department of Neighborhoods comes in.

This is not a power grab. It is a power share. At the heart of this Executive Order is a commitment to advance the effective deployment of equitable and inclusive community engagement strategies across all city departments. This is about making information and opportunities for participation more accessible to communities throughout the city.

 

“This is not about silencing voices. It’s the exact opposite. It’s about bringing more people into the conversations or at least creating opportunities for people to participate so they can be heard.”

 
Face-to-face meetings are incredibly important and those are not going away. But not every person can attend a community meeting, and the ability to do so should not determine who gets to participate and who gets to be heard.

We’d love to hear what tools YOU need to be successful and how WE can help you. Share your ideas with us:

  • Send an email to NewDON@seattle.gov.
  • Share your comments below.
  • Contact us at 206-684-0464 or mail us at P.O. Box 94649, Seattle, WA 98124-4649.
  • Join and follow the conversation online using #AdvancingEquitySEA at:

Facebook – @SeattleNeighborhoods
Twitter – @SeaNeighborhood

This is about making things easier and less exhaustive. This is about connecting communities to government and to one another. This is about moving forward.

Kathy Nyland, Director
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods

People’s Academy for Community Engagement Now Accepting Applications

People's Academy for Community EngagementSeattle Department of Neighborhoods is accepting applications to the People’s Academy for Community Engagement (PACE), our civic leadership development program for the next wave of community leaders. The fall session begins September 27 and runs through December 6.

During the 10-week program, 25-30 emerging leaders (18 years and up) will learn hands-on strategies for community building, accessing government, and inclusive engagement from experts in the field. PACE has a strong focus on Seattle’s community and neighborhood organizations and the city’s governmental structure and processes.

Fall sessions will be held on Tuesday evenings from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. at Miller Community Center. Topics include: Approaches to Leadership, Government 101, Community Organizing, Inclusive Outreach and Public Engagement, Meeting Facilitation, Public Speaking, Conflict Resolution, and Sustaining Involvement.

Tuition for the 10-week program is $100. Tuition assistance is available. To apply, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/programs-and-services/peoples-academy-for-community-engagement/pace-application. The application deadline is Friday, August 12 at 5:00 p.m.

Given the popularity of the program, PACE will be offered three times a year: winter, spring and fall. The winter session will begin in January of 2017. For more information, visit our webpage and for questions, email PACE@seattle.gov.

CSA Subscriptions Available from Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens

Seattle P-Patch Market GardensYou can receive up to 18 weeks of high quality, farm-fresh, organic produce when you subscribe to the Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens CSA (community-supported agriculture). Each week subscribers will receive up to 15 items of organic seasonal produce grown at the NewHolly and High Point Seattle Market Gardens, a Seattle Department of Neighborhoods program that helps to establish healthy communities and economic opportunity in low-income neighborhoods.

The cost ranges from $15 to $25 a week based on the size of the share with prorated shares available. Two of the pick-up locations are located at the gardens where subscribers can meet the immigrant farmers and visit the site.

The pick-up locations, dates, and times are:

Thursday evenings, now through October 13 from 5:00-7:00 p.m. at:
High Point Market Garden (32nd Avenue SW and SW Juneau Street)
NewHolly Market Garden (42nd South and South Rockery Drive)

Saturdays, now through October 15 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at:
St. Andrews Episcopal Church (111 NE 80th Street)

Community members can subscribe now by completing and mailing an application (see form for address); or you can contact Michelle Jones at 206-372-6593 or Julie Bryan, P-Patch Garden Coordinator, at 206-684-0540.


Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens is a program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods P-Patch Community Gardening Program in collaboration with the Seattle Housing Authority and GROW to support low-income gardeners. Its mission is to establish safe, healthy communities and economic opportunity through Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and farm stand enterprises.

Want a P-Patch Community Garden Plot? We Have Openings!

Market GardenerInterested in growing your own organic vegetables while connecting with your neighbors? Our P-Patch community gardens are for you.

While very popular, there are times when we have openings or short waiting lists for plots in the gardens. There are presently openings at Picardo P-Patch in Wedgwood and Colman P-Patch in Madrona. If interested, contact Vanesa Gutierrez at 206.615.1787.  P-Patches with short waitlists include Hawkins in Central Area, Oxbow in Georgetown, NewHolly Youth and Family in NewHolly, Leo Street in Rainier View and Courtland Place in Mt. Baker. You can sign up for the interest list here.

There are 90 P-Patch community gardens located across the City. You can learn more about the program on our webpage.

Deadline Approaches for Matching Funds to Support your Neighborhood Project

Othello+Intl+music+nwlrSeptember 2 workshop for interested applicants
Application deadline is October 5

If your group needs funds to do a neighborhood project, our Neighborhood Matching Fund may be able to help. However, you’ll need to be quick because the application deadline for the Small and Simple Projects Fund is Monday, October 5 at 5:00 p.m. This fund provides awards of up to $25,000 to for community-building projects that are matched by community contributions.

To learn about the Small and Simple Projects Fund, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/nmf/smallandsimple.htm. This is the last opportunity in 2015 to apply to this fund.

The final workshop is scheduled for Wednesday, September 2 from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. at University Heights Community Center (Room 209), 5031 University Way NE. The workshop provides an overview of the Neighborhood Matching Fund, the qualities of a good project, and the application process and requirements. To RSVP, go online at surveymonkey.com/r/ZHM36BJ or call  206-233-0093. The workshop is open to all.

Our Neighborhood Matching Fund staff is available to advise groups on ways to develop successful applications and projects. You are strongly encouraged to call 206.233.0093 or email NMFund@seattle.gov to discuss your project idea with one of our project managers.

The Neighborhood Matching Fund (NMF) Program awards matching funds for projects initiated, planned, and implemented by community members. Its goal is to build stronger and healthier neighborhoods through community involvement and engagement. Every award is matched by a neighborhood’s contribution of volunteer labor, donated materials, in-kind professional services, or cash.

High Point and NewHolly Farm Stands Open for Business

Farm Stand OpeningThe High Point and NewHolly Farm Stands offer fresh organic produce picked right from the P-Patch market gardens. Grown by low-income gardeners, the produce that is fresh right now is spinach, carrots, leafy vegetables, new onions, peas, turnips, and radishes, to name a few.

The farm stands’ hours of operation are 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

  • High Point Farm Stand (32nd Ave. SW and SW Juneau Street) open Wednesdays from July 9 to September 24.
  • NewHolly Farm Stand (S. Holly Park Dr. between 40th Ave. S. and Rockery Dr. S.) open Fridays from July 11 to September 26.

Both farm stands accept EBT cards and participate in Fresh Bucks which doubles consumers’ first $10 spent on the card. Come see the garden, meet the farmers, and enjoy their fresh produce.

Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens is a program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods P-Patch Community Gardening Program in collaboration with Seattle Housing Authority and GROW to support low-income gardeners and their neighborhoods. Its mission is to establish safe, healthy communities and economic opportunity through Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and farm stand enterprises.

To learn more, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/ppatch/marketgardens/.

 

CSA Subscriptions Available from Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens

veggiesThe Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens CSA (community-supported agriculture) program is accepting subscribers for its farm-fresh organic produce. Beginning in June, each week subscribers will receive up to 15 items of organic seasonal produce grown at the NewHolly and High Point Seattle Market Gardens, a Seattle Department of Neighborhoods program that helps to establish healthy communities and economic opportunity in low-income neighborhoods.

The cost ranges from $15 to $25 a week based on size of the share with prorated shares available. Two of the pick-up locations are located at the gardens where subscribers can meet the immigrant farmers and visit the site.

The pick-up locations, dates, and times are:

Thursdays, June 5 through October 16 from 5:00-7:00 p.m.
High Point Market Garden (32nd Avenue SW and SW Juneau Street)
NewHolly Market Garden (42nd South and South Rockery Drive)

Saturdays, June 7 through October 18 from 10:00 a.m. to dusk
St. Andrews Episcopal Church (111 NE 80th Street)

Community members can subscribe now by completing and mailing an application (see form for address) or by contacting Michelle Jones at 206-372-6593 or Julie Bryan, P-Patch Garden Coordinator, at 206-684-0540.

Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens is program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods P-Patch Community Gardening Program in collaboration with the Seattle Housing Authority and GROW to support low-income gardeners. Its mission is to establish safe, healthy communities and economic opportunity through Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and farm stand enterprises. Visit www.seattle.gov/neighborhoods/ppatch/marketgardens/ to learn more.

 

NewHolly and Columbia City Featured in Tour for National League of Cities Conference

Photo credit:  R Frestadt

Photo credit: R Frestadt

More than 50 people attending the National League of Cities Conference had the opportunity to visit neighborhoods in Southeast Seattle when we hosted a mobile workshop on community engagement. Hailing from big cities to small, the attendees learned about DoN programs, but also got to hear and visit Seattle Housing Authority projects, NewHolly Market Garden (along with gardeners), the Columbia City Historic District, and the Rainier Valley Cultural Center (RVCC). Thanks goes to Deputy Mayor Smith, Councilmember Bagshaw, Nora Liu (DPD), Tom Eanes (SHA), in addition to Mark Hannum, Mikala Woodward, and Rob Mohn of Columbia City and the RVCC, plus DoN staff for serving as guides and facilitators. Attendees were most impressed with the remarkable involvement of community members and their ability to initiate change and improve their neighborhoods. Plus after touring Columbia City, we have no doubt that many made the trip back to eat and shop! 

 

 

Last chance to visit New Holly and High Point Farm Stands

lLatinoCulturalDSC_5912This week will be your last chance of the season to visit High Point and NewHolly Farm Stands. High Point Farm Stand’s last day is on Wednesday and the NewHolly Farm Stand’s last day is this Friday.

 The hours of operation are 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. So come on down, visit the bountiful gardens, buy some fresh veggies, and meet the gardeners.

  • High Point Farm Stand (32nd Ave. SW and SW Juneau Street)
    NewHolly Farm Stand (S. Holly Park Dr. between 40th Ave. S. and Rockery Dr. S.)

Both farm stands take cash or checks (sorry, no credit cards). They also accept EBT cards and participate in the new Fresh Bucks Project which doubles consumers’ first $10 spent on the card.

Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens is a program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods P-Patch Community Gardening Program in collaboration with the Seattle Housing Authority and P-Patch Trust to support low-income gardeners and neighborhoods. Its mission is to establish safe, healthy communities and economic opportunity through Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and farm stand enterprises.

To learn about the Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens, visit www.seattle.gov/neighborhoods/ppatch/marketgardens/.

High Point and NewHolly Farm Stands Open this Week

lLatinoCulturalDSC_5912The High Point and NewHolly Farm Stands open this week offering fresh organic produce picked right from the P-Patch Market Gardens. Fresh right now are spinach, carrots, leafy vegetables, new onions, peas, turnips, and radishes, to name a few.  The hours of operation are 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

  • High Point Farm Stand (32nd Ave. SW and SW Juneau Street) open Wednesdays from July 10 to October 9.
  • NewHolly Farm Stand (S. Holly Park Dr. between 40th Ave. S. and Rockery Dr. S.) open Fridays from July 12 – October 11.

Both farm stands accept EBT cards and participate in the new Fresh Bucks Project which doubles consumers’ first $10 spent on the card.

Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens is a program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods P-Patch Community Gardening Program in collaboration with the Seattle Housing Authority and P-Patch Trust to support low-income gardeners and neighborhoods. Its mission is to establish safe, healthy communities and economic opportunity through Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and farm stand enterprises.

To learn about the Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens, visit www.seattle.gov/neighborhoods/ppatch/marketgardens/.