Mayor Murray Announces $501,415 in Matching Fund Awards for Community-Based Projects

Tavseer's 11th Yoni Ki Baat

Yoni Ki Baat from Tasveer’s 11th Aaina: South Asian Women’s Focus Festival (2015 NMF funded project)

Mayor Ed Murray announced an investment of $501,415 in matching funds to support 24 neighborhood-initiated projects across the City. The awards are part of the City’s Neighborhood Matching Fund (NMF), which provides more than $3 million each year to local organizations.

The awards are part of the Small and Simple Projects Fund, one of three funds offered by Seattle Department of Neighborhoods. It provides cash awards of up to $25,000 in matching funds to community organizations committed to fostering and building a better community. The organizations that have recently received grants pledge to match the City of Seattle’s $501,415 investment with $537,295 of locally raised money, donated materials, and volunteer labor.

“Since 1988, the Neighborhood Matching Fund has supported thousands of projects driven by neighborhoods across the city. All of us benefit from the creativity and dedication of community volunteers who make their ideas a reality with the help of the Fund.” – Mayor Ed Murray

For 28 years, more than 5,000 projects have been funded in partnership with the NMF Program, and its investment in neighborhoods can be seen across the city. For more information about NMF, visit In early December, the website will provide information on the 2017 funding opportunities and deadlines.




  • $25,000 to Friends of the Ballard Civic Orchestra to organize a free classical concert series and workshops reflecting the theme of building community through music. The series will celebrate Latino and Hispanic cultural heritage. (Community match: $18,360)
  • $25,000 to World Kulturz dba Native Kulturz Group to organize a series of dance workshops and performances that interweave the Contra, Metis jig, Native Powwow and Coastal dance communities. (Community match: $26,450)
  • $25,000 to The Art of Alzheimer’s to organize a series of arts-focused activities and workshops to raise awareness and reduce stigmas about people and families living with dementia. (Community match: $37,620)
  • $25,000 to Casa Latina to engage the community in a series of conversations to help determine how Casa Latina can best continue to serve Latino immigrants. (Community match: $17,790)
  • $14,000 to La Sala to create a community engagement and social change art project about women as commodity in our culture. The project will have free hands on workshops, five public community engagement art events, and a gallery exhibition opening in April 2017. (Community match: $15,340)
  • $20,000 to International Women’s Day – 2017 to host a free event to celebrate International Women’s Day. Through story-telling, facilitated conversations, collaborative art, and dance, participants will know they are part of a caring and vibrant community of women. (Community match: $12,345)
  • $25,000 to Columbia City Theater Group to produce a play, film festival, graphic-novel adaptation, and accompanying resources for and with youth. These activities will engage youth in social justice through storytelling and the exploration of race, socioeconomics, education, and the arts. (Community match: $43,575)
  • $25,000 Sundiata African American Cultural Association to hold a free, two-day festival next February to celebrate Black History month. The family-friendly event will have food, vendors, art, and music, as well as presentations on the contributions of African Americans in the United States. (Community match: $31,640)
  • $25,000 to Amigos De Seattle to organize a series of family-oriented workshops about Guatemalan culture, history, and peoples. They will feature folkloric performances and cultural exchange to unite the Guatemalan community as well as people interested in experiencing Guatemalan cultural expression. (Community match: $15,900)


District 1

  • $25,000 to South Park Area Redevelopment Committee (SPARC) to prepare construction documents and permits for Duwamish Waterway Park improvements. SPARC will continue to work with the consultant to facilitate a community engagement and design process. (Community match: $25,995)
  • $4,000 to Fauntleroy Centennial Committee to host a free community event, A Century of Serving the Community, at the Fauntleroy Schoolhouse. Activities include a display of archives, erection of a new flagpole, and a mini carnival. (Community match: $3,000)
  • $25,000 to Van Lang to host a six-month series of free language workshops open to youth and adults for both Vietnamese and English as a second language. In addition to language instruction, there will be cross cultural opportunities to learn about Vietnamese culture. (Community match: $37,280)
  • $25,000 to Delridge Grocery Cooperative to develop the planning and feasibility of opening and sustaining a grocery coop in Delridge. It will also study the viability of the business plan. (Community match: $16,170)


District 2

  • $14,500 to Hillman City P-Patch to reclaim the accessible gravel paths and develop an accessible gardening area. It includes an update to the 2010 visioning plan and the initiation of a monthly series of events designed to engage the gardeners, neighbors, and partner organizations. (Community match: $14,245)
  • $24,415 to Somali Family Safety Task Force to host workshops to enhance bonding between Somali teens and their mothers to strengthen relationships and foster community building in a supportive environment. Attendees will participate in workshops designed to explore relationships, facilitate communication, skill building, and peer mentoring. (Community match: $18,910)
  • $13,000 to Beacon Hill Hub to develop outreach and community planning to get input to guide final programming and design of the Beacon Hill Hub building. Four charrettes will obtain input on a multiservice venue to be a unique presence for people of color in South Beacon Hill. (Community match: $43,235)


District 3

  • $25,000 to Friends of Safe Access: Street to Park to create a conceptual plan for a safe and accessible west entry to Mt. Baker Park. A design firm will work with the community in preparing conceptual drawings for the replacement of the steep path that currently exists. (Community match: $12,500)
  • $25,000 to First Hill Improvement Association to continue the work of leading the community through final design and construction documentation for improvements to First Hill Park. This phase will build off of the approved Phase 1 concept plan. (Community match: $15,350)
  • $15,000 to Seattle Poetry Slam to host an all-ages, three-day celebration of LGBTQ arts and community. The Queer Resurgence on Capitol Hill Poetry Festival will include panel discussions, workshops, and a poetry slam competition. (Community match: $7,200)


District 4

  • $7,000 to U District Advocates to activate a heavily-used alley located at 1414 NE 42nd St to make it safer, cleaner, and more inviting for a diverse community of neighbors and visitors. (Community match: $7,220)
  • $25,000 to Sanctuary Art Center to build community through the transformation of the utility boxes in the University District from ordinary obstructions into community assets that contribute to both placemaking and wayfinding. (Community match: $24,480)


District 5

  • $14,500 to 45th Ave NE Neighborhood Safety Taskforce to lead a visioning process with the community. The project will solicit input from neighborhood stakeholders about how best to address traffic and pedestrian safety concerns on 45th Ave NE, a major pedestrian and bike route serving three schools. (Community match: $8,000)


District 6

  • $25,000 to BF Day PTSA to replace aging circa-1989 school playground equipment with a new play area geared towards preschoolers and younger elementary students (K-2 grades) and neighborhood children. (Community match: $52,950)


District 7

  • $25,000 to Freeway Park Association to engage the community in a conversation about how connectivity, visibility, and public safety at Freeway Park can be improved. Three meetings will be held for area residents and park stakeholders that will result in conceptual design recommendations for future use. (Community match: $31,740)

Tell the City What You Think at Our New One-Stop Shop for Public Input Opportunities

Add Your VoiceFor the past 3 months, we’ve been reaching out to Seattle residents through our Engage Seattle survey and campaign to get feedback on how the City can more effectively and equitably manage our outreach and engagement efforts.

During this process, we’ve heard one thing loud and clear: people want City information to be more centralized and more easily accessible.

We hear you and we are already taking steps to make this a reality!

For us, one of the most important first steps was to make it easier for residents to track and respond to public input requests from the City. The City of Seattle seeks public input in a variety of ways: through public meetings, surveys, direct outreach, online conversations, and more. What was clear is that we needed to create an online hub where we could bundle and house all of these active feedback opportunities.

This past August we did just that. We launched our Add Your Voice webpage, which serves as a one-stop shop for City of Seattle projects and topics currently open to public input. There you will find input opportunities organized by topic with clear timelines and links for more information.

We invite you to visit the site, explore the available opportunities for public feedback, and Add Your Voice!

We will continue to fine tune and improve this site as we move forward with our equitable outreach and engagement strategies. If you have ideas for improvement, please let us know by adding a comment to this post.

Changing the City’s Approach to Outreach and Engagement

Message from Kathy Nyland, Director of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods:

Engage SeattleOn Monday, September 26, Mayor Murray presented his 2017-2018 Proposed Budget to the Seattle City Council. His proposal includes legislation that addresses equitable outreach and engagement and outlines a new citywide framework for community involvement to be led by the Department of Neighborhoods (DON).

The proposed legislation:

  • Advances a citywide approach to outreach and engagement that prioritizes equity and recognizes barriers to participation;
  • Demonstrates the City’s commitment to implementing equitable and inclusive community involvement strategies across all City Departments;
  • Directs City departments to develop well designed, responsive, and culturally relevant public involvement plans; and
  • Creates a Community Involvement Commission to advise on City plans, policies, strategies, and community grant funding processes and make recommendations that advance equitable public engagement and civic participation.

This legislation is now available on our Engage Seattle webpage or by clicking the links below:

Impact on community groups:

Many of you have asked what the legislation means for the future of the District Council system.  Let me be clear:  the legislation does not dissolve or disband District Councils or any other community groups. It doesn’t replace face-to-face meetings or prohibit participation by any person or group – to the contrary, it helps create more opportunities for dynamic community engagement. As Seattle continues to grow and change, the City must continually revisit and expand its public engagement efforts to encourage broad participation across all demographic groups.

Work Plan:

In addition to the legislation, DON has also identified and developed a strategy for implementing a suite of initiatives and tools designed to make it easier for individuals and community groups to participate in the civic life of our city.  This work plan was crafted in partnership with other City departments and informed by responses to DON’s ongoing Engage Seattle survey effort.

Since launching Engage Seattle in August 2016, DON has collected over 3,500 responses and discussed the effort with community members at more than 30 local events.  If you haven’t already, I encourage you to make your voice heard by filling out the survey.

Going forward, you can depend on DON to:

  • Focus on more access and more opportunity. We will broaden our reach and work with many groups, knowing that no one speaks for all. Everyone has a voice, and it is our job to listen.
  • Implement a broad range of new initiatives and tools to encourage greater and more diverse participation.
  • Work with city departments to ensure their outreach and engagement work is equitable and transparent through consultation, collaboration, and tools to assist in their work.


We hope you will join us as we continue this important conversation.

Congratulations to the 21 Graduates of People’s Academy for Community Engagement

2016 PACE GraduatesLast week, 21 “up-and-coming” community leaders celebrated their graduation from the People’s Academy for Community Engagement (PACE), a program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods. These emerging leaders went through the nine-month program to gain skills in leadership, community involvement, and civic engagement. Director Kathy Nyland attended the graduation event at Seattle City Hall along with family members, community leaders, and city staff.

The graduating participants represent all sectors of the city and more than half are from historically underrepresented communities. In addition to attending sessions held at Seattle University, the PACE graduates had monthly homework assignments and put their skills to the test as they worked collaboratively on community-based projects, which were presented at the celebration. “We are better community leaders due to the amazing facilitators that went the extra mile for us during our over 27 hours in class,” said Patrick Jones, a PACE graduate.

PACE is now offered three times a year. The Fall 2016 session began September 27. The Winter 2017 session will begin January 21, 2017. More information and an official application for the winter session will be available in early December. To learn more, contact Hilary Nichols at 206.684.5667 or visit our webpage.


Congratulations to the 2016 PACE Graduating Class:

PACE Graduate Neighborhood District
Danielle Wallace East
Victor Straube Southeast
Andrea Lai East
Deborah Vandermar Delridge
Gwyn Howard Greater Duwamish
Jamillah Bomani Southeast
Laura Bernstien Northeast
Lexi Potter Southwest
Lisa Sawyer Downtown
Lylianna Allala Delridge
Mark Mendez North
Matthew Adkins Queen Anne/Magnolia
Monica Sweet North
Nnenna Odim Central
Patrick Jones East
Sarah Trowbridge Lake Union
Siobhan Whalen Downtown
Susan Russell Northwest
Terique Scott Downtown
Tiffany Chan Greater Duwamish
W. Michael Wong Greater Duwamish


Mayor Murray Presents Proposed 2017-18 Budget – Director Nyland Discusses the Changes to Department of Neighborhoods

Kathy NylandThis afternoon, Mayor Murray presented his Proposed 2017-2018 Budget to the Seattle City Council. A section of this budget will focus on a new direction for Seattle Department of Neighborhoods (DON).

As you know, the Mayor issued an Executive Order in July that mandated the City of Seattle to approach outreach and engagement in a more equitable manner. It directed this department to lead and work with all City departments on their outreach and engagement practices that reaffirm the City’s commitment to inclusive participation.

This direction is reflected in our mission – to strengthen Seattle by engaging all communities. We do this every day by fostering community partnerships, cultivating emerging leadership, and facilitating community inclusiveness.

In the Mayor’s Proposed 2017-2018 Budget, you will find legislation that addresses these outreach and engagement principles and outlines a new citywide framework for community engagement. This will be the roadmap as we continue to develop a suite of tools with broader access points.

Below are the highlights to DON’s budget that reflect this work:

  • Two staff members will continue their work in outreach and engagement oversight and city-wide coordination.
  • Two positions will focus on improving the City’s outreach and engagement to neighborhoods during impactful construction projects.
  • Two positions will provide additional capacity to the POEL (Public Outreach and Engagement Liaison) program with a focus on low-income transit options.
  • One position will broaden the participatory budgeting approach to new audiences.

Additional capacity and investments:

  • One part-time position will be dedicated to Historic Preservation process improvements.
  • One Accounting Technician position will serve the Department of Education and Early Learning.
  • One position will be dedicated to Grants and Contracts.
  • $185,000 dedicated to outreach efforts for the Housing Affordability & Livability Agenda, including funds to review the city’s historic preservation program review process.


These are just some of the highlights reflected within the Proposed 2017-2018 Budget. Over the next two months, Seattle City Council will be reviewing and deliberating the proposed budget. To learn more about how you can provide your input, visit

We have an incredible opportunity before us to rethink and reimagine how we interact with one another. It’s not just about how the City talks with communities, but it’s about how communities can talk with and learn from one another. In the coming week, you can learn more about the legislation, the timeline, and the expected deliverables at our website.

Outreach and engagement is the core of what we do. Equity, transparency and “meeting people where they are” are our guiding principles. We hope you’ll join us as we continue to transform the way our City reaches out, listens to, and works with communities.


Kathy Nyland, Director


City of Seattle Seeks Contractors for Outreach Work to Underrepresented Communities

Public Outreach and Engagement LiaisonSeattle Department of Neighborhoods is seeking individuals to do part-time outreach work to underrepresented communities in Seattle’s neighborhoods. Known as Public Outreach and Engagement Liaisons (POELs), these contractors must be connected to their respective cultures, fluent in the languages, and bi-cultural and bi-lingual. The languages we are presently seeking include Cantonese, Mandarin, Vietnamese, Korean and Khmer.

The main tasks of a POEL are to provide:

  • Quality translations.
  • Fair and equitable facilitation (in native language) to culturally specific community groups.
  • Simultaneous interpretation.
  • Feedback and expertise on cultural concerns and barriers.
  • Planning and execution of community workshops and events that parallel larger City-hosted meetings.

POELs are compensated independent contractors. The applicants must have extensive experience organizing and facilitating community meetings and must be fluent and able to interpret and translate in at least one other language. The positions are generally flexible with any type of schedule and include either daytime or evening hours as well as some weekends.

If interested, please send a resume or a short biography by October 14, plus two references to or:

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
POEL Program
P.O. Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124

For more information about the POEL program, please visit our website.

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Seeks Public Outreach and Engagement Liaisons

The Seattle Department of Neighborhoods is seeking a Farsi speaking Public Outreach and Engagement Liaison (POEL) and a Sikh POEL. POELs are independent contractors with the City of Seattle. They must be connected to their respective culture and bilingual. The main tasks of a POEL are to provide:

  • Quality translations.
  • Fair and equitable facilitation (in native language) to culturally specific community groups.
  • Simultaneous interpretation.
  • Feedback and expertise on cultural concerns and barriers.
  • Planning and execution of community workshops and events that parallel larger City-hosted meetings.

POELs are compensated at $50/hr. The positions are generally flexible with any type of schedule and include either daytime or evening hours as well as some weekends. Applicants must have extensive experience organizing and facilitating community meetings, and must be fluent and able to interpret and translate in at least one other language.

Interested parties should send a resume or brief bio and two references to DON_LIAISON@SEATTLE.GOV.

Learn more about our Public Outreach and Engagement Liaisons on our website.

Aurora Licton Neighbors Transform Path to Licton Springs Park

Aurora Licton neighbors just completed the first Find It, Fix It Community Project for the 2016 cycle!!

After the Find It, Fix It Community Walk in her neighborhood, Amy Provenzano rallied her neighbors and submitted a community project grant application to clear out & clean up the cut-thru path on N. 95th St. to Ashworth Ave N., a heavily used corridor that also serves as a neighborhood path to Licton Springs Park. The right of way had been attracting litter and posing a safety hazard as walkers could not see beyond the overgrown grass and bushes next to the path.

The project was awarded $1,000 from the City of Seattle, which covered the cost of equipment rentals, plants, dirt, ground cover, and rockery.

This past Saturday and Sunday (8/20 and 8/21), with tools donated from Seattle’s Urban Forestry division, 11 volunteer community members cleared 5,620 square feet of space and mulched 5,161 square feet. The group collected over 100 cubic feet of yard debris along with 4 bags of trash and recycling. Most importantly, they created a cleaner, safer common space that connects and strengthens their neighborhood.

And, seeing the appreciation that neighbors who used the path shared with the group of volunteer community members was amazing.

Aurora Licton Find It, Fix It Community Project

Aurora Licton Find It, Fix It Community Project DSC_0051 Aurora Licton Find It, Fix It Community Project

Seattle Wants to Make Participation Easier: Tell Us How

Engage SeattleThe City of Seattle is shifting our approach to outreach and engagement. We need your ideas on how the City can keep you better informed about City projects, events, opportunities, and issues. Tell us how you want to participate, and what we can do to make it easier:

  • Use our online conversation tool where you can weigh in alongside your neighbors and share ideas. Here’s how to use it:
    • Click on the site.
    • Go to Log In (upper right-hand corner) where you’ll be asked to create a simple account.
    • View each question, click on a statement, and drag the slider to show your opinion and add a comment.
  • Take our two-minute survey. It’s fast and easy.
  • Provide feedback via social media using #EngageSeattle or find us on Twitter (@SeaNeighborhood) or Facebook (SeattleNeighborhoods).
  • Email us at
  • Find us at community events and festivals in August and September to talk with us in-person. A list of events is on our website.

Help bring more voices to the table. Let’s make our outreach and engagement work for everyone!

Neighborhood Matching Fund Invests $417,000 in 23 Neighborhood Projects

Dragonfly Street MuralMayor Ed Murray announced an investment of $417,227 in matching funds to support 23 neighborhood-initiated projects across the city. The awards, distributed from our Neighborhood Matching Fund, will support a wide variety of projects from community celebrations to multi-media training for youth.

“For 28 years the Neighborhood Matching Fund has helped to support the efforts of community members to make improvements to their communities and neighborhoods,” said Murray. “These projects have included playground improvements, creation of community sidewalks, and construction of parklets for all to enjoy. These efforts are successful because they are driven by community members building connections and engaging with each other to make their projects happen.”

The awards are part of the Small and Simple Projects Fund, one of three funds offered by Seattle Department of Neighborhoods. It provides cash awards of up to $25,000 in matching funds to community organizations committed to fostering and building a better community. The 2016 June awards range from $5,100 to $25,000, and the organizations pledge to match the City of Seattle’s $417,227 investment with $550,072 of locally raised money, donated materials, and volunteer labor.

“These efforts are successful because they are driven by community members building connections and engaging with each other to make their projects happen.”

In addition to the Small and Simple Projects Fund, the Neighborhood Matching Fund (NMF) has two other programs: the Large Projects Fund which provides matching funds of up to $100,000, and the Small Sparks Fund which provides funds of up to $1,000. Over its 28-year history, more than 5,000 projects have been funded with the help of NMF, and its investment in neighborhoods can be seen across the city. For more information about all of the funds visit

The Small and Simple Projects Fund has one more opportunity to apply this September. To learn more visit


June 2016 Small and Simple Projects Fund Awards


  • $24,990 to Blanket Fort Films to empower filmmakers from underrepresented communities by providing free access to video equipment and training. (Community match: $35,400)
  • $5,100 to Sisters of South Seattle for an event to get K-12 students excited about going back to school with food, games, school supplies, along with information on time management and after-school activities. (Community match: $5,100)
  • $13,906 to Seattle Architecture Foundation for a series of events that share the impact of community coalitions shaping Seattle through community-based design projects. Attendees will exchange strategies and resources for implementing projects to improve the quality of life in their neighborhoods. (Community match: $8,244)

District 1

  • $25,000 to Friends of Highland Park Elementary School to create construction drawings based on its conceptual site plan, in addition to continuing outreach efforts to ensure spaces created are inviting to the many cultures in its community. (Community match: $13,600)
  • $5,000 to Circulo de Mamas Seattle for a project to educate and reach out to the Latino community through civic engagement activities. (Community match: $31,000)
  • $4,000 to Fauntleroy Watershed Council & Fauntleroy Community Association for landscape design concept drawings for a small green space/pocket park to present to potential donors. (Community match: $2,250)
  • $13,345 to Camp Long Mountain Fest Steering Committee to organize Mountain Fest 2016 on Sept. 10, a day of free access to activities including rock climbing and other opportunities for environmental learning. (Community match: $13,555)

District 2

  • $17,000 to Breast Cancer Awareness Steering Committee for a free family-friendly event on Oct. 22-23 to raise awareness of the importance of early detection in the fight against breast cancer. (Community match: $21,850)
  • $25,000 to Beacon Hill International School Playground Steering Committee for a community-led project to replace the outdated and unsafe playground structure that was recently removed from the play area. (Community match: $85,825)
  • $17,575 to Mount Baker Business District Association to produce a business district festival with tactical urbanism installations to promote the Mount Baker Hub business district and develop a sense of community and place around the Mount Baker Light Rail Station. (Community match: $20,040)
  • $25,000 to Alleycat Acres to transform an SDOT Right of Way into a community space providing neighbors a safe, clean environment to walk, gather, and grow food. The Wetmore Community Garden will increase food security through education and volunteerism, encouraging community members to grow their own food. (Community match: $32,585)
  • $16,300 to Friends of Rainier Beach Streatery at Jude’s to construct a streatery with a bicycle and edible garden theme to serve as a point of pride and identification for the neighborhood and serve as a hub for youth-focused community events. (Community match: $16,325)
  • $25,000 to Project Orca Playground to install play equipment, native plantings, interpretive signage and other improvements to the outdoor play area and rain garden at the Orca K-8 public school. (Community match: $26,000)
  • $12,000 to Saturday Studio to design and build a parklet for the Hillman City Collaboratory which will  be a community space that tells and helps form the ongoing story of Hillman City. (Community match: $12,000)

District 3

  • $24,413 to Friends of Jimi Hendrix Park Committee to produce a day-long celebration to showcase the grand opening of Jim Hendrix Park to include speakers, a concert, food trucks and activities for children. (Community match: $28,733)
  • $24,000 for Tasveer to organize the 3rd South Asian International Documentary Festival next February 11-12. It will bring people together to engage with the cultural, artistic and activist work of the South Asian region and people. (Community match: $37,700)
  • $20,000 to Multimedia Resources Training Institute to create a one-hour documentary, 30 photo portraits, and other multimedia projects produced by youth interns and focused on the Central Area. (Community match: $12,640)
  • $25,000 to Madrona School PTSA for design and construction documents for an engaging play structure that will allow the grounds to be open to the public outside of school hours. The redesign will improve transitions and redo the landscaping. (Community match: $17,800)
  • $25,000 to Volunteer Park Trust to create preliminary schematic design for a new performance stage as part of the Volunteer Park Amphitheater Project. (Community match: $15,325)

District 4

  • $23,190 to Eastlake P-Patch Community Garden to replace the deteriorating garden infrastructure and to widen paths. Work will be done by community volunteers under the guidance of professional construction management volunteers. Improvements will be vetted via meetings, email, phone, and posting of information and surveys. (Community match: $23,970)

District 5

  • $15,408 to Team of N. 137th Street Residents to identify possible solutions to increase pedestrian safety and traffic calming on N. 137th Street between Greenwood and Linden Avenues. The project will build and strengthen community bonds by creating opportunities to meet neighbors and work together for a common goal. (Community match: $7,725)

District 7

  • $6,000 to Interbay P-Patch Community Gardeners to work with neighbors to replace the roofing on the tool and food bank structures. These enhancements will give the garden an aesthetically consistent and secure look from the street. (Community match: $5,180)
  • $25,000 to Downtown Seattle Association to improve the crosswalks at the intersection of 7th Avenue and Westlake Avenue as part of SDOT’s Community Crosswalk program. Community-driven design and collaboration will be essential to the project. (Community match: $77,225)