IT’S HAPPENING!!! Youth Voice, Youth Choice’s First Project!

Safe Routes to School: Rainier Beach High SchoolYou asked for it, youth of Seattle!  And, now, with unprecedented ‘City’ speed, we just rolled out the first of many Youth Voice, Youth Choice projects.  To refresh your memory, Safe Routes to Schools was one of the projects that you prioritized via Youth Voice, Youth Choice with YOUR VOTE this past May.

Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) has just finished construction on one of the three Safe Routes to Schools projects by installing a painted curb bulb at S Henderson St and 53rd Ave S near the Rainier Beach High School.  And not just any kind of paint, but a checker board pattern of blue and orange.  Go Vikings!

That’s right, Rainier Beach High School students, just in time for your first day of school in September.

As for the other two Safe Routes to Schools projects, installation of speed humps on S Kenyon St/Way near Wing Luke Elementary School and a raised crosswalk at the intersection of 16th Ave SW & SW Myrtle St, these will be built in 2017.

Stay tuned for more details on those projects in the coming months!

Full list of 2016 awarded projects:

Youth Choice 2016 Vote Results

Advancing Equitable Outreach and Engagement

Message from Kathy Nyland, Director

Mayor Murray recently issued an Executive Order directing the city to approach outreach and engagement in an equitable manner. Putting an equity lens on our approaches is bold and, yes, brave. It shows a commitment to practices that address accessibility and equity.


What does this mean?

  • We often hear that meetings can feel like we are “checking a box.” The Mayor’s action means we can create processes that are more relationship-based and build authentic partnerships.
  • It means that we can create plans that are culturally sensitive, which includes an emphasis on translated materials.
  • It means we broaden access points, identify obstacles and turn them into opportunities.


What else does this mean?

  • It means we have an opportunity to recreate, re-envision and reconcile many lingering issues, including defining the difference between neighborhoods and communities, providing clarity about roles, and creating a system of engagement that builds partnerships with, and between, communities throughout the city of Seattle.
  • It means that we will be working to expand choices and opportunities for community members throughout this city, recognizing a special responsibility to plan for the needs of those who face barriers to participation.
  • It means that we’ll work with city offices and departments on community involvement to ensure that they are effective and efficient through the wise use and management of all resources, including the community’s time.
  • And it means we will expand the toolbox and make some investments in digital engagement.

 

Seattle is a unique city, and we are fortunate to have so many valuable partners currently at the proverbial table. Those partners play an important role and that role will continue. While we are appreciative of the countless hours our volunteers spend making our city better, we recognize and acknowledge there are barriers to participation. There are communities who cannot be at the table, while there are some communities who don’t even know there is a table. This is where the Department of Neighborhoods comes in.

This is not a power grab. It is a power share. At the heart of this Executive Order is a commitment to advance the effective deployment of equitable and inclusive community engagement strategies across all city departments. This is about making information and opportunities for participation more accessible to communities throughout the city.

 

“This is not about silencing voices. It’s the exact opposite. It’s about bringing more people into the conversations or at least creating opportunities for people to participate so they can be heard.”

Face-to-face meetings are incredibly important and those are not going away. But not every person can attend a community meeting, and the ability to do so should not determine who gets to participate and who gets to be heard.

We’d love to hear what tools YOU need to be successful and how WE can help you. Share your ideas with us:

  • Send an email to NewDON@seattle.gov.
  • Share your comments below.
  • Contact us at 206-684-0464 or mail us at P.O. Box 94649, Seattle, WA 98124-4649.
  • Join and follow the conversation online using #AdvancingEquitySEA at:

Facebook – @SeattleNeighborhoods
Twitter – @SeaNeighborhood

This is about making things easier and less exhaustive. This is about connecting communities to government and to one another. This is about moving forward.

Kathy Nyland, Director
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods

People’s Academy for Community Engagement Now Accepting Applications

People's Academy for Community EngagementSeattle Department of Neighborhoods is accepting applications to the People’s Academy for Community Engagement (PACE), our civic leadership development program for the next wave of community leaders. The fall session begins September 27 and runs through December 6.

During the 10-week program, 25-30 emerging leaders (18 years and up) will learn hands-on strategies for community building, accessing government, and inclusive engagement from experts in the field. PACE has a strong focus on Seattle’s community and neighborhood organizations and the city’s governmental structure and processes.

Fall sessions will be held on Tuesday evenings from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. at Miller Community Center. Topics include: Approaches to Leadership, Government 101, Community Organizing, Inclusive Outreach and Public Engagement, Meeting Facilitation, Public Speaking, Conflict Resolution, and Sustaining Involvement.

Tuition for the 10-week program is $100. Tuition assistance is available. To apply, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/programs-and-services/peoples-academy-for-community-engagement/pace-application. The application deadline is Friday, August 12 at 5:00 p.m.

Given the popularity of the program, PACE will be offered three times a year: winter, spring and fall. The winter session will begin in January of 2017. For more information, visit our webpage and for questions, email PACE@seattle.gov.

Deadline Approaches for Matching Funds to Support your Neighborhood Project

Othello+Intl+music+nwlrSeptember 2 workshop for interested applicants
Application deadline is October 5

If your group needs funds to do a neighborhood project, our Neighborhood Matching Fund may be able to help. However, you’ll need to be quick because the application deadline for the Small and Simple Projects Fund is Monday, October 5 at 5:00 p.m. This fund provides awards of up to $25,000 to for community-building projects that are matched by community contributions.

To learn about the Small and Simple Projects Fund, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/nmf/smallandsimple.htm. This is the last opportunity in 2015 to apply to this fund.

The final workshop is scheduled for Wednesday, September 2 from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. at University Heights Community Center (Room 209), 5031 University Way NE. The workshop provides an overview of the Neighborhood Matching Fund, the qualities of a good project, and the application process and requirements. To RSVP, go online at surveymonkey.com/r/ZHM36BJ or call  206-233-0093. The workshop is open to all.

Our Neighborhood Matching Fund staff is available to advise groups on ways to develop successful applications and projects. You are strongly encouraged to call 206.233.0093 or email NMFund@seattle.gov to discuss your project idea with one of our project managers.

The Neighborhood Matching Fund (NMF) Program awards matching funds for projects initiated, planned, and implemented by community members. Its goal is to build stronger and healthier neighborhoods through community involvement and engagement. Every award is matched by a neighborhood’s contribution of volunteer labor, donated materials, in-kind professional services, or cash.

Rainier Beach Merchants Association Challenges Storefronts to “Light Up the Beach!”

Light up the Beach!The “Light Up the Beach” Holiday Challenge is on in Rainier Beach! This new event, created by the Rainier Beach Merchants Association and sponsored by Seattle Department of Neighborhoods and Rainier Beach Safeway, challenges storefront proprietors along Rainier Ave South, from South Henderson to “Old Town” Rainier Beach at 57th Ave South, to dress up their storefronts by partnering with community groups and local artists, or relying on their own creative energy. Awards for best displays will be voted on by the community.

Efforts will be featured during a collective open house on Friday, December 5th from 5-8pm, where the community will be welcomed to walk the street, meet storefront owners who will be hosting food, beverage, music, dance performances and activities, and vote for their favorite displays via passport maps highlighting participating storefronts and community partners.  Prizes will be awarded in a number of categories including “Best Global Theme,” “Best Promotion of Peace,” “Best Overall,” and “Best Hospitality.” Also, gift cards will be awarded in a drawing of turned in passport voting cards.

Event hubs are the Rainier Beach Safeway (where free holiday photos will be taken by local artist Derek Johnson), and Jude’s in Old Town (where you can nibble, listen to music, and get a sneak peek at Beau & Courtney Hebert’s new joint!). Luminaria created by the Southeast Seattle Senior Center, and carolers from the Rainier Beach United Methodist Church and Rainier Beach Community Club will guide the way.

By engaging community groups, artists, schools, and business owners to light up the beach, this event invites connectedness, fosters community pride, and encourages traffic calming and walkability on the streets of Rainier Beach.

More information at rainierbeachsquare.com http://www.rainierbeachmerchants.com/?p=2056

Free emergency preparedness training offered at Southeast Seattle P-Patch community gardens

Free training on emergency preparedness will be offered at six Southeast Seattle P-Patch community gardens beginning in September. The training will cover basic preparedness, how to stay safe in an earthquake, using the P-Patch as a Community Emergency Hub, and a review of supplies that will be stored at the P-Patch. Thirteen Southeast Seattle P-Patch gardens will serve as Community Emergency Hubs where residents can gather, share information and resources, and problem-solve after an emergency.

Anyone is welcome to attend. Translated materials and interpretation services will be available in 12 languages including Amharic, Somali, Tigrinya, Chinese, Hmong, Mien, Lao, Thai, Vietnamese, Khmer, and Spanish. The schedule is as follows:

September 14th

10 a.m. -1 p.m.               Angel Morgan P-Patch, 3956 S Morgan St
2 p.m. – 5 p.m.                Hillman City P-Patch, 4613 S Lucile St

September 28th

10 a.m. -1 p.m.               John C. Little P-Patch, 37th Ave S & S Willow
2 p.m. – 5 p.m.                New Holly Rockery P-Patch, New Holly Drive S & S 40th St.

October 12th

10 a.m. – 1 p.m.              Thistle P-Patch, Martin Luther King Jr Way & Cloverdale St
2 p.m. – 5 p.m.                Judkins P-Patch, 24th Ave S & S Norman St

Funding for this program came from a $35,000 grant awarded to the Office of Emergency Management (OEM) and Seattle Department of Neighborhoods (DoN) through the FEMA 2012 Community Resilience Innovation Challenge. This award was one of 30 selected from more than 1900 applications. 

Interpretation services will vary according to the location. For more information and to ensure interpreters will be available in specific languages, contact Tracy Connelly (OEM) at tracy.connelly@seattle.gov (206-233-5076) or Julie Bryan (DoN) at Julie.Bryan@seattle.gov (206-684-0540).

Congratulations to the Rainier Beach and Broadview-Bitter Lake-Haller Lake Neighborhoods!

Great news: the Rainier Beach and Broadview – Bitter Lake – Haller Lake neighborhood plan updates are done! Last month we held the final community meetings in the update process. Approximately 40 people attended the Broadview – Bitter Lake – Haller Lake meeting and 110 people attend the Rainier Beach meeting. Deputy Mayor Smith, Councilmember Burgess, DPD Director Diane Sugimura and DON Director Bernie Matsuno attended the Rainier Beach meeting and provided opening remarks.

We made a significant transition during the March meetings. The community is now leading the effort to shape the future of their neighborhood; the City will play a supportive role. We are excited that 19 Broadview – Bitter Lake – Haller Lake community members signed up for at least one of the three Action Teams: create a town center on Linden; improve safe walking and biking; and build community. In Rainier Beach, 64 people signed up to participate on Action Teams! Their teams will work on: a place for everyone; lifelong learning; growing food to develop healthy industry; and a beautiful safe place.

We are grateful to the community members who demonstrated their commitment to their neighborhood by helping us update the neighborhood plans.  Thank you for being willing to roll up your sleeves and get the work done!

Rainier Beach Urban Farm and Wetlands Preserve Groundbreaking October 1

Join us for the groundbreaking ceremony of the Rainier Beach Urban Farm and Wetlands Preserve.  This project was supported in part with a $50,000 award from the Neighborhood Matching Fund Large Projects Fund.

Saturday, October 1, 2011
Time: 10:00 am – 3:00 pm
Location: Rainier Beach Urban Farm & Wetlands at Atlantic City Nursery
5513 S Cloverdale St, Seattle WA 98118

This will be an event for the whole family. Activities will include:

  • Farm and Wetlands walking tours
  • Live music from local bands
  • Delicious food to cook and eat

Meet neighborhood farms and special guests……. and many more!

Two Meetings for Neighborhood Plan Updates in March

We are updating the neighborhood plans in Rainier Beach and in Broadview/BitterLake/Haller Lake! It’s time to take a fresh look at those neighborhood plans. In the late 1990s, people worked together to create these plans, which are the communities’ plans to guide growth and change. Things have changed since 1999 when the plans were developed.

Is Broadview/Bitter Lake/Haller Lake or Rainier Beach your neighborhood? Then we want to hear from you. Come tell us what’s important to keep, what’s missing, and what needs attention. Together, let’s make these neighborhoods even better.

Be part of the conversation! There will be a series of community meetings to hear your suggestions on how to achieve your community’s vision. You will have the opportunity to help identify—and prioritize—goals and action steps for your neighborhood plan. The plan identifies actions that the community and the City should take to make your neighborhood a better place. You are the experts and your ideas will direct the work to update this important plan over the next year.

Broadview/Bitter Lake/Haller Lake…
…What’s Your Message?

Saturday, March 12, 2011
9:00 a.m. – Noon: Community Meeting
Noon – 1:00 p.m. Open House

Broadview-Thomson K-8 School (Cafeteria)
13052 Greenwood Ave. N. Seattle

Planning Outreach Liaisons and interpreters will be available for the following:

Español, Jesus Rodriguez
(425) 923-0904
Youth, Erica Bush (518) 779-9772
Seniors & People Living w/Disability
Pam Carter (206) 992-4851
Renters, David Kelley
(360) 286-9905

 

Rainier Beach…Make Your Voice Heard!

Saturday, March 19, 2011
9:00 a.m. – Noon: Community Meeting
Noon – 1:00 p.m. Open House 

South Shore K-8 School
4800 S. Henderson Street Seattle, WA 98118

Interpretation by Planning Outreach Liaisons will be available for the following:

Amharic: Ethiopia Alemneh 
(206) 234-6830
Laotian, Ratana Phoulaiat
(206) 331-8759
Afan Oromo, Issa Ulo
(206) 501-7880
Luqadda Soomaaliga, Nafiso Samatar (206) 778-9755 Ilokano / Tagalog, Sefie Cabiao
(206) 721-3935
Español, Jesus Rodriguez
(425) 923-0904
Hmong , Hua Thao (425) 345-7423

  

Can’t come to the meetings?Learn more, sign up for e-mail alerts, and fill out a survey at: www.seattle.gov/dpd/Neighborhood_Planning/. Don’t miss out on future meetings: notification will be by email. 

Childcare and light refreshments will be provided. To request information, interpretation, ADA accommodations, or to sign up for childcare (please notify us), contact:

Kerry Wade
(206) 733-9091
kerry.wade@seattle.gov