CSA Subscriptions Available from Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens

Seattle P-Patch Market GardensYou can receive up to 18 weeks of high quality, farm-fresh, organic produce when you subscribe to the Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens CSA (community-supported agriculture). Each week subscribers will receive up to 15 items of organic seasonal produce grown at the NewHolly and High Point Seattle Market Gardens, a Seattle Department of Neighborhoods program that helps to establish healthy communities and economic opportunity in low-income neighborhoods.

The cost ranges from $15 to $25 a week based on the size of the share with prorated shares available. Two of the pick-up locations are located at the gardens where subscribers can meet the immigrant farmers and visit the site.

The pick-up locations, dates, and times are:

Thursday evenings, now through October 13 from 5:00-7:00 p.m. at:
High Point Market Garden (32nd Avenue SW and SW Juneau Street)
NewHolly Market Garden (42nd South and South Rockery Drive)

Saturdays, now through October 15 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at:
St. Andrews Episcopal Church (111 NE 80th Street)

Community members can subscribe now by completing and mailing an application (see form for address); or you can contact Michelle Jones at 206-372-6593 or Julie Bryan, P-Patch Garden Coordinator, at 206-684-0540.


Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens is a program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods P-Patch Community Gardening Program in collaboration with the Seattle Housing Authority and GROW to support low-income gardeners. Its mission is to establish safe, healthy communities and economic opportunity through Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and farm stand enterprises.

Join the Conversation on Housing Affordability & Livability

HALA Focus GroupIn the last five years, rents in Seattle have increased 35% and the homeless population is nearing 3,000.

“We are facing our worst housing affordability crisis in decades,” says Mayor Murray.“My vision is a city where people who work in Seattle can afford to live here.”

The Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda (HALA), is a set of strategies intended to address this crisis from all sides. The City is relying heavily on public input to take these strategies from ideas to practice and would love to hear from you.

The HALA Team has a cool online conversation called “Consider it” (https://hala.consider.it/) where you can weigh in alongside your neighbors and engage in dialogue around the City’s HALA proposals. When you go to the site, you’ll see a list of topics where you can view the proposals and read others’ comments. If you want to participate in the conversation, you’ll be prompted to create an easy log-in. The HALA team will be adding ideas to the site and looking for folks to return and check in as new topics are added. The City is committed to listening to the community and using the feedback it hears to shape the policies and practices of HALA.

This is civic engagement at work—join the conversation!

Youth Tell the City How to Spend $700,000 of Public Funds

Youth Voice, Youth ChoiceMayor Ed Murray has announced the project winners of Youth Voice, Youth Choice, the City’s new Participatory Budgeting (PB) initiative in which youth decide how to spend $700,000 of the City’s budget. More than 3,000 youth ages 11-25 voted on 19 project proposals in May.

The seven winning projects are:

  • Houses for People Experiencing Homelessness
  • Youth Homeless Shelter Improvements
  • Job Readiness Workshops for Homeless Youth
  • Homeless Children and Youth Liaison Services
  • Wi-Fi Hotspot Checkout
  • Park Bathroom Upgrades
  • Safe Routes to Schools

Thanks to the leadership of former Councilmember Nick Licata, we launched participatory budgeting to empower the youth of Seattle and to show them that their voice matters in shaping this city. Through this process, we learned that young people are concerned about the homelessness crisis gripping our city, as well as issues of equity and public safety. They want to help those who are suffering and to create safer streets for walking or biking.” – Mayor Ed Murray

The process started in January with several assemblies where the public brainstormed ideas for projects it would like to see in their communities. The 20 youth delegates turned those ideas into 19 concrete proposals with help from Seattle Department of Neighborhoods and City staff. Now that the choices have been made, City staff and local agencies will implement the projects.

“We are thrilled to see that so many youth participated in this program,” said Kathy Nyland, director of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods. “Over 3,000 have spoken and we have heard them. It’s now up to us to implement these ideas so these projects become a reality.”

Participatory Budgeting is a civic engagement program in which community members decide how to spend a portion of a City’s budget. Seattle has joined Chicago, New York, Boston, and cities across the globe in using the process. Youth Voice, Youth Choice is managed by Seattle Department of Neighborhoods.

For more information, contact Jenny Frankl at 206-233-2044 or visit the Youth Voice, Youth Choice website.

Seattle Votes Campaign Aims to Lower Barriers to Immigrant and Refugee Civic Engagement

Seattle Votes - Young Somali WomenIn April, the Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs (OIRA) launched the Seattle Votes campaign to identify barriers to voting and civic engagement for Seattle’s immigrant and refugee residents. The campaign consists of an anonymous survey that will provide data for organizations, King County, and the City to better understand the civic needs of specific immigrant and refugee communities within Seattle.

“Immigrants and refugees are a vital thread in the fabric of Seattle, with one out of five residents foreign-born,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “Often these communities face significant obstacles to gaining citizenship and participating in elections. Through Seattle Votes, we will gain community-level data to help us better serve these communities, creating more opportunity for refugees and immigrants to participate in our democracy.”

There has been a great response rate to the survey, but the City has a goal of reaching just under 1,700 more responses by June 17!

  • If you are an immigrant/refugee over the age of 18 living in King County, please take the survey. It takes about 6 minutes, and the results are completely anonymous.
  • If you have friends, family, and/or colleagues over the age of 18 who are immigrants/refugees living in King County, please share this blog post with them, and encourage them to complete a Seattle Votes online survey.

The Seattle Votes online survey has been translated into ten languages:

The City will publish the findings in an official report in August. The disaggregated results will help inform policies to improve naturalization, voter registration, and voting rates.

City Announces $75,000 Summer Opportunity Fund

Summer Opportunity FundApplications are now available for the City of Seattle Summer Opportunity Fund. This fund provides $75,000 for community-based summer projects that support positive activities and opportunities for youth while reducing violence that disproportionately affects communities of color in Seattle. Community organizations, groups, and businesses are encouraged to apply.

To be considered, projects should focus on education, employment, justice, violence prevention, health, or a combination of these topics. Projects should also include opportunities to involve East African and Black/African American young men ages 18-24 living in or attending school in Seattle. The City is looking for community-based ideas and encourages applicants to leverage other resources such as community partnerships, in-kind donations, and existing resources and services.

Funded projects will receive between $5,000 and $15,000, and all programming must run between July 22 and October 31, 2016. The application deadline is Monday, June 20 by noon.

Individual application assistance sessions are available by appointment on:

  • June 2, 11:30 – 5 p.m. at the New Holly Seattle Public Library (7058 32nd Avenue S)
  • June 8, 4 – 7:30 p.m. at the Rainier Beach Community Center, Teen Room (8825 Rainier Ave S)
  • June 9, 4 – 7:30 p.m. at the Douglass-Truth Seattle Public Library (2300 E Yesler Way)

Schedule a 30-minute assistance session by emailing DON_Grants@seattle.gov. Attendance is not mandatory for funding consideration but highly encouraged.

The Summer Opportunity Fund is funded by the Seattle Human Services Department and administered by the Department of Neighborhoods.

For information, guidelines, and the application, please visit our website.

City of Seattle Seeks Contractors for Outreach Work to Underrepresented Communities

POEL working with members of the public at a Delridge Projects WorkshopSeattle Department of Neighborhoods is seeking individuals to do part-time outreach work to underrepresented communities in Seattle’s neighborhoods. Known as Public Outreach and Engagement Liaisons (POELs), these contractors must be connected to their respective cultures, fluent in the languages, and bi-cultural and bi-lingual. The main tasks of a POEL are to provide:

  • Quality translations.
  • Fair and equitable facilitation (in native language) to culturally specific community groups.
  • Simultaneous interpretation.
  • Feedback and expertise on cultural concerns and barriers.
  • Planning and execution of community workshops and events that parallel larger City-hosted meetings.

POELs are compensated independent contractors. The positions are generally flexible with any type of schedule and include either daytime or evening hours as well as some weekends. The applicants must have extensive experience organizing and facilitating community meetings, and must be fluent and able to interpret and translate in at least one other language. The languages we are presently seeking include Vietnamese, Chinese (both Mandarin and Cantonese), Spanish, Korean, and Somali. The applicants must live or work in the following neighborhoods:

  • North End: Especially Lake City and Northgate
  • University District
  • West Seattle

If interested, please send a resume or a short biography, plus two references to DON_Liaison@seattle.gov or:

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
POEL Program
P.O. Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124.

For more information about the POEL program, please visit our website.


See below for language translations of the original press release:

CHINESE_POEL-recruitment
KOREAN_POEL-recruitment
SOMALI_POEL-recruitment
SPANISH_POEL-recruitment
VIETNAMESE_POEL-recruitment

Mayor Murray Seeks New Members for Landmark Preservation Board

Before/After Supply Laundry Building SLU

Supply Laundry Building in SLU (designated as Seattle Landmark in September 2005)

Mayor Edward Murray is looking for four new members to serve on the Landmark Preservation Board in the following positions: Historian, Structural Engineer, Finance, and Real Estate.

The 12-member Landmark Preservation Board makes recommendations to the Seattle City Council for landmark designation and reviews all proposed physical alterations to designated features of landmark properties.

The Board is composed of two architects; two historians; one structural engineer; one representative each from the fields of urban planning, real estate, and finance; a Get Engaged member (a position for adults ages 18-29), and three members at-large. All appointments are made by the Mayor, subject to City Council confirmation.

Board meetings are held on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 3:30 p.m. The Architect and Historian board members also serve on the Board’s Architectural Review Committee (ARC). In general, Board members must commit approximately 10 hours per month to Landmark Board business.

Interested applicants must be Seattle residents, and Board members serve without compensation. Those interested in being considered should send a letter of interest and resume by Friday, June 10. Electronic submissions are preferred, if possible.

Please email your letter and resume to: Erin.Doherty@seattle.gov
(reference the Landmarks Preservation Board in the subject line)

To submit a paper copy, please address: Erin Doherty, Landmark Preservation Board Coordinator, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, PO Box 94649, Seattle, WA 98124-4649. For more information, contact Erin Doherty at (206) 684-0380.

The City of Seattle is committed to promoting diversity in the city’s boards and commissions. Women, persons with disabilities, sexual and gender minorities, young persons, senior citizens, persons of color, and immigrants are encouraged to apply.

Youth Voice, Youth Choice Vote Week is May 21-29

Youth Voice, Youth ChoiceDo you want a say in how to spend $700,000 of Seattle’s City budget? If you’re between the ages of 11 – 25 and live, work, or go to school in Seattle, YOU CAN!

Youth can cast votes for their favorite project ideas during our Youth Voice, Youth Choice Vote Week taking place May 21-29.

Youth Voice, Youth Choice is a new participatory budgeting initiative of the City of Seattle in which youth ages 11-25 democratically decide how to spend a portion of the City’s budget. After several months of collecting ideas from community members, and youth volunteers turning those ideas into proposals, we’re readying for the vote which will occur Saturday, May 21 through Sunday, May 29. Youth will cast votes for their favorite projects, ranging from park improvements to youth programs to arts funding.

Make a difference in your community! Cast your vote at an in-person polling site or vote online. The projects that receive the most votes will be funded by the City!

Visit our webpage the week before vote week to see the list of projects and get information on how and where to vote.

If you work with youth in the Seattle area, you can also host an in-person Polling Site of your own to make sure as many youth as possible have a chance to participate in this important vote. Polling Sites can be hosted at an existing meeting, in a community center, or a public place (like outside a transit center or other heavily trafficked area, as long as you have permission from the property owner). You just need to complete our Polling Site Registration Form.

GET OUT THE VOTE! If you’d like to post about Youth Voice, Youth Choice, use the hashtag #YouthVoiceSea.

 


The ABCs of HALA

On Tuesday, April 19, more than 200 people gathered at the Museum of History & Industry for Mayor Murray’s Livability Night Out to learn more about Seattle’s Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda (HALA), a multi-pronged strategy for addressing the housing affordability crisis in Seattle.

Mayor Ed Murray and directors of city departments talked about housing affordability and what makes Seattle livable, including education, arts, transportation, civil rights, public spaces, and more. City directors outlined how their departments would contribute to the livability agenda.

Our own Kathy Nyland, director of the Department of Neighborhoods, wrote and presented a poem called The ABCs of HALA in honor of the event. We’ve had several requests for copies of the poem so we’ve included the text at the bottom of this article. And, thanks to our colleagues at The Seattle Channel, you can watch the full evening’s presentation in the video below (Kathy Nyland’s presentation beings at the 17:30 mark).

 

 

If you are interested in learning more about HALA or adding your voice to the conversation, attend one of the many Community Focus Groups. Everyone is welcome to attend, listen to conversation, and chime in with public input at appropriate times on the agenda.

Thank you to everyone who joined us on April 19th. It was an inspiring evening!

 

The ABCs of HALA by Kathy Nyland

This is my ode. And yes, it will rhyme.
But it will be quick and won’t take much time.

H is for HOUSING, the essential need
For all of us no matter color or creed.
It’s true, we must build much more
For all – especially the middle and poor.
We’re looking at much, such as heights and at zones
Conversations we’ll have, ALL with a civil tone.

Make it Affordable, many do say.
So in Seattle more people can stay.
Let’s put a roof over everyone’s head.
20,000 affordable units the Mayor has said.
Tech and the trades; new mixed with old
Onto Seattle’s character, we must hold.

Livability is the L. It’s often given a score
Access to schools, transit, parks and more.
It’s about the capital L, our quality of life
Walking to work and not commuting from Fife.
Live where you work. Work where you live
Live by yourself or perhaps with a relative.

Agenda is HALA’s second A
65 recs to guide our way.
To keep Seattle home it’s what we must do
We love it here, and other people do too.
Let’s not debate growth. Seattle is a city for all.
Let’s not close the door behind us or build a wall.

Please note, I am not here to preach.
DON’s role in this is public outreach.
Events will be planned and to meetings we’ll go.
Questions will be answered and information will flow.
We will listen to what you have to say
And incorporate your comments in a meaningful way.

Seattle is growing and it’s happening now.
We want to grow smart so let’s figure out how.
To create this bold housing policy without hesitation.
We’ll need to build more, reuse, and rely on preservation.
For green space needs how about more trees or a P Patch?
Or maybe you need a fund like our Neighborhood Match?

Department of Neighborhoods is here to assist.
We’re writing down questions and comments; we’re making a list.
We will keep you updated, informed and engaged
With traditional tools and some from the tech age.
Together, we’ll solve the housing crisis, you’ll see.
Because it’s the right thing to do; it’s about equity.

HALA

Join the Mayor’s Education Summit!

Mayor's Education SummitThe Mayor’s Education Summit Community Conversation series took place all over the city to collect ideas from students, parents, and advocates about how the City of Seattle can help improve educational opportunities for all children and youth in Seattle. The last Community Conversation is at the end of April. And then you are invited to the Mayor’s Education Summit where you’ll hear a summary of the top ideas and suggestions gathered during the two-month-long community conversation process.

The Mayor and education experts will present actions the City can take to reduce the education disparities among our children and close the achievement gap so all kids can succeed in school. “Perhaps the greatest challenge we face in addressing the opportunity gap is the persistent disparities in our public schools,” said Mayor Murray. “This is not just the responsibility of the Seattle school district. All of us have a responsibility to support the success of these students. These children are our children and we must not fail them.”

The last time the City convened an Education Summit was in 1990, when then Mayor Norm Rice established a deeper partnership between the City, Seattle Public Schools and education advocates. City residents came together to propose a new support for students and educators, the Families & Education Levy.

The Mayor’s Education Summit will take place on Saturday, April 30 at Garfield Community Center (2323 E Cherry St, Seattle, WA 98122).

Space is limited. Please RSVP today!

Volunteers Needed!

We are also seeking volunteers to help out with the Mayor’s Education Summit to be held at Garfield Community Center on Saturday, April 30, 2016. Volunteers will be needed largely for shifts between 8:30 am and 3:30 pm on April 30, as well as a few hours for setup on the Friday evening prior. If you’re interested in volunteering, please fill out this online Volunteer Sign-up Form, and we will contact you with additional information.

For more information about volunteering at the Summit, please contact Stacey Jehlik (stacey.jehlik@seattle.gov or 206.684.8266).