Seattle Renters’ Commission urges City of Seattle to take action on two issues affecting renters

The Seattle Renters’ Commission has recently issued statements urging the City of Seattle to act on two issues affecting renters:

  • In line with their 2015 resolution, Seattle City Council and Mayor Durkan are urged to affirm their support of a repeal of the Statewide rent control ban; and once state ban is lifted, pass an ordinance to implement rent control in Seattle.
  • Seattle City Council should amend existing ordinance SMC 7.24.030 to provide renters with 180-day notice for any rent increase.

Excerpts on rent control:

“The unpredictability and rate of rent increases in the past decade has caused a massive burden on renters which has led to both homelessness and displacement of Seattleites. Meanwhile, Washington is the only remaining state or province on the west coast to have no form of rent control. With the passage of a rent control law, the City Council and Mayor can provide meaningful support to struggling communities in Seattle and Washington State.

Seattle renters are facing a crisis and our City Council and Mayor must act accordingly. If we do nothing, the cost of rent will continue to skyrocket while more and more Seattleites will be forced onto the streets or out of the region entirely. By passing robust rent control legislation now, you will not only help increase pressure on State Legislators to lift the ban, you will also avoid any delay in implementing rent control once the ban is lifted protecting more renters.”

Excerpts on 180-day notice for rent increase:

“The unpredictability and rate of rent increases in the past decade has caused a massive burden on renters which has led to both homelessness and displacement of Seattleites. By providing renters with 180 days, the City will give tenants adequate time to make financial adjustments, save money, or find new housing when faced with a rent increase.

Seattle has rapidly become one of the most expensive cities to live in over the last decade and as a result, rent increases have become a key driver in economic evictions, displacement among women, families, poor communities, and people of color. Meanwhile, Seattle has not addressed rent increase notices since 1999…
Currently, forty-six percent of Seattle renters are rent burdened and a worker earning minimum wage at $15 per hour at 40 hours per week will spend 73 percent of their earnings on an average Seattle rent of $1,770 per month.”

Read the full statements from the Seattle Renter’s Commission on our website under “Statements from the Commission.”


The Seattle Renters’ Commission (SRC) provides information, advice, and counsel to the Mayor, Seattle City Council, and departments concerning issues and policies affecting renters. Learn more at seattle.gov/neighborhoods/seattle-renters-commission. The SRC is staffed by Seattle Department of Neighborhoods.