Aurora-Licton Find It, Fix It Community Walk

find it fix it logoMayor Murray’s Find It, Fix It Community Walks provide a unique opportunity for community members to identify neighborhood needs and discuss challenges directly with City leaders. Our first walk of the year will be held in the Aurora-Licton neighborhood on Tuesday, May 31 beginning at 6:00 p.m. Refreshments will be provided.

Aurora-Licton Find It, Fix It Community Walk
Tuesday, May 31, 2016, 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Meet at the Oak Tree Village Shopping Center by the AMC Loews Oak Tree 6 (Between N 100 St. and N 103 St. on Aurora Ave N.)

Schedule
6:00 p.m. – 6:20 p.m.

  • Welcome remarks from Mayor Ed Murray
  • Find It, Fix It Mobile App tutorial

6:20 p.m. – 7:15 p.m.

  • Walk commences along the following route (map):
    • East on N 100th St.
    • South on  Ashworth Ave. N
    • South on Stone Ave. N
    • West on N 90th St.
    • North on Aurora Ave. N

7:15pm – 7:30 p.m. 

  • Walk concludes at Lantern Brewing on N 95th St.
  • Department representatives and City staff available for follow-up questions

In partnership with Cities of Service, the City will offer up to $5,000 in grants for community-led projects to each 2016 Find It, Fix It Walk neighborhood. The Aurora-Licton Community Project Grant Application is available on May 25 at www.seattle.gov/finditfixit until Friday, June 10. If you have an idea for a project in Aurora-Licton, please apply today!

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City of Seattle Seeks Contractors for Outreach Work to Underrepresented Communities

POEL working with members of the public at a Delridge Projects WorkshopSeattle Department of Neighborhoods is seeking individuals to do part-time outreach work to underrepresented communities in Seattle’s neighborhoods. Known as Public Outreach and Engagement Liaisons (POELs), these contractors must be connected to their respective cultures, fluent in the languages, and bi-cultural and bi-lingual. The main tasks of a POEL are to provide:

  • Quality translations.
  • Fair and equitable facilitation (in native language) to culturally specific community groups.
  • Simultaneous interpretation.
  • Feedback and expertise on cultural concerns and barriers.
  • Planning and execution of community workshops and events that parallel larger City-hosted meetings.

POELs are compensated independent contractors. The positions are generally flexible with any type of schedule and include either daytime or evening hours as well as some weekends. The applicants must have extensive experience organizing and facilitating community meetings, and must be fluent and able to interpret and translate in at least one other language. The languages we are presently seeking include Vietnamese, Chinese (both Mandarin and Cantonese), Spanish, Korean, and Somali. The applicants must live or work in the following neighborhoods:

  • North End: Especially Lake City and Northgate
  • University District
  • West Seattle

If interested, please send a resume or a short biography, plus two references to DON_Liaison@seattle.gov or:

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
POEL Program
P.O. Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124.

For more information about the POEL program, please visit our website.


See below for language translations of the original press release:

CHINESE_POEL-recruitment
KOREAN_POEL-recruitment
SOMALI_POEL-recruitment
SPANISH_POEL-recruitment
VIETNAMESE_POEL-recruitment

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Neighbors Invited to Help Plan Belltown Find It, Fix It Community Walk

Welcome to Belltown Mural

Photo: Sean Davis

Belltown residents and business owners are invited to help plan the upcoming Belltown Find It, Fix It Community Walk, the second of seven Mayor-led walks happening this year. During these walks, neighbors, police, and City officials walk together to identify physical elements in the neighborhood that make it feel unsafe or poorly maintained. Once the elements are identified, the City and community work together to fix the problems.

The Belltown walk will be held on Tuesday, June 28 from 6 – 7:30 p.m. and will follow a route determined by community members serving on its Community Walk Action Team. If you are interested in volunteering for this team, contact Find It, Fix It Program Coordinator Laura Jenkins at laura.jenkins@seattle.gov or 206.233.5166.

In addition, Belltown community members are invited to apply for up to $5,000 to complete community projects that improve the safety or appearance of their neighborhood. To apply for a Belltown Community Project Grant, community members can find the application at seattle.gov/finditfixit beginning Thursday, June 23 through Friday, July 8.

Lastly, community members don’t have to wait for the walk to report safety needs or city maintenance issues. They can use the Find It, Fix It mobile app:

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Mayor Murray Seeks New Members for Landmark Preservation Board

Before/After Supply Laundry Building SLU

Supply Laundry Building in SLU (designated as Seattle Landmark in September 2005)

Mayor Edward Murray is looking for four new members to serve on the Landmark Preservation Board in the following positions: Historian, Structural Engineer, Finance, and Real Estate.

The 12-member Landmark Preservation Board makes recommendations to the Seattle City Council for landmark designation and reviews all proposed physical alterations to designated features of landmark properties.

The Board is composed of two architects; two historians; one structural engineer; one representative each from the fields of urban planning, real estate, and finance; a Get Engaged member (a position for adults ages 18-29), and three members at-large. All appointments are made by the Mayor, subject to City Council confirmation.

Board meetings are held on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 3:30 p.m. The Architect and Historian board members also serve on the Board’s Architectural Review Committee (ARC). In general, Board members must commit approximately 10 hours per month to Landmark Board business.

Interested applicants must be Seattle residents, and Board members serve without compensation. Those interested in being considered should send a letter of interest and resume by Friday, June 10. Electronic submissions are preferred, if possible.

Please email your letter and resume to: Erin.Doherty@seattle.gov
(reference the Landmarks Preservation Board in the subject line)

To submit a paper copy, please address: Erin Doherty, Landmark Preservation Board Coordinator, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, PO Box 94649, Seattle, WA 98124-4649. For more information, contact Erin Doherty at (206) 684-0380.

The City of Seattle is committed to promoting diversity in the city’s boards and commissions. Women, persons with disabilities, sexual and gender minorities, young persons, senior citizens, persons of color, and immigrants are encouraged to apply.

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Art Brightens Up Windows of Historic Lincoln Reservoir Gate House

Installation of art at the Lincoln Reservoir Gate House

Installation of art at the Lincoln Reservoir Gate House

Washington Middle School students at work on the project

Washington Middle School students at work on the project

The historic Lincoln Reservoir Gate House at Cal Anderson Park just got a lot more colorful. Fourteen original temporary artworks created by nine Washington Middle School students now grace the windows of the gate house and feature images inspired by the four seasons.

The project, titled Seasons All Around, is a collaboration between the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture, Seattle Parks and Recreation’s Out of School Time program at Washington Middle School, Seattle Public Utilities, and our own Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Historic Preservation Program. Students worked with teaching artist Nate Herth over 15 weeks to design and create the 14 original paintings, which reflect on the park and the vibrancy of Seattle. The classes took place at Washington Middle School and the students, representing the many races and ethnicities of Seattle, drew upon their varied prior experience with art, color, and Seattle’s neighborhoods to create this public art installation.

Our Historic Preservation program was involved in this project as the Lincoln Reservoir and adjoining Bobby Morris Playfield were designated as a Seattle Landmark in November 1998. The reservoir, built after the Great Seattle Fire of 1889, was put to use in 1901. In 2000 the reservoir was taken out of service and replaced by underground tanks, but the gate house remains. The park reopened in 2005 with four additional acres of useable open space.


This Sunday, May 22 from 11 a.m. to noon you can join the students, teaching artist Nate Herth, and City departments as we host an opening celebration of the temporary artworks.

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Seeking Volunteers for North Seattle College Standing Advisory Committee

North Seattle College Health Sciences and Student Resources Building

North Seattle College Health Sciences and Student Resources Building

Do you live in North Seattle and have an interest in serving on a committee that advises on the development plans of the North Seattle College?

Our Major Institutions and Schools Program, which provides a way for neighbors of Seattle’s hospitals, universities, and colleges to be directly involved in the development plans for those institutions, is currently seeking interested community members to participate on the North Seattle College Standing Advisory Committee.

This committee provides feedback on projects planned and under development by the college to ensure it complies with its Master Plan. The Master Plan describes zoning rules, long range planning of the property, and transportation planning.

If you live in North Seattle and have experience in neighborhood organizing and issues, land use and zoning, architecture or landscape architecture, economic development, building development, educational services, or just an interest in your neighborhood’s future, we highly encourage you to apply.

The committee meets at North Seattle College one to four times a year. Committee members serve a two-year renewable term. If you are interested in serving on this committee, send a letter of interest via e-mail or regular mail by Tuesday, May 31 to Maureen Sheehan at:

E-mail: Maureen.Sheehan@seattle.gov

Mailing Address:
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
P.O. Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124-4649

For more information contact Maureen Sheehan, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, at 206-684-0302.

The City of Seattle is committed to promoting diversity in its boards and committees; women, young adults, senior citizens, persons with disabilities, sexual and gender minorities, persons of color, and immigrants are highly encouraged to apply.

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Picardo Farm P-Patch Plots Available

Picardo P-PatchWe have available plots now and during the summer in the fabulous Picardo Farm P-Patch in northeast Seattle.This P-Patch is the oldest and biggest in the city and is rumored to have Seattle’s “best soil!”

You can grow fresh produce for yourself and your family while learning great gardening techniques from your neighbors.

If you are interested in signing up for a plot, contact Rich Macdonald at rich.macdonald@seattle.gov or call 206-386-0088.

Visit our website to learn more about the Picardo Farm P-Patch.

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City of Faces at the Angel Morgan P-Patch

City of Faces by George Lee

Our Angel Morgan P-Patch will be hosting an art exhibition featuring birdhouses created from the faces of local youth. The exhibition, titled City of Faces, was created by George Lee in an effort to build community and deter youth violence in the everyday streets of South Seattle.

The exhibition opens with a party Sunday, May 15th from 3-6pm and will be on display through October 15.

Inspired by two close calls with gun violence near his home, George Lee set out to create a project that would change the narrative of his neighborhood. During the creation process, thirty youth learned about local birds and their nesting needs, and chose one bird for which to make a birdhouse. They then went through the brave task of having their faces cast in clay.

The finished project features a child’s face as the front of the birdhouse and their mouth as the bird entrance. The 30 seed-like ceramic birdhouses have been hung from organically curving posts of red cedar at the Angel Morgan P-Patch. The piece is “an exploration of refuge/home, fertility/life/youth, and the interconnection between human and non-human life,” states George Lee.

Lee is a Seattle-based artist specializing in site-specific sculpture and social practice art. City of Faces is a partnership with Somali Family Safety Task Force, Rainier Beach Community Center, Aki Kurose Middle School and Rainier Avenue Church. The project was funded by the Seattle Office of Arts and Culture.

Join us for the opening this Sunday May 15th from 3-6pm. There will be food, light refreshments, and raw materials from the creation process will be on display. Participating youth and their families will also be in attendance.

The Angel Morgan P-Patch Community Garden is located at 42nd Avenue S and S Morgan Street.

You can learn more about the project at George Lee’s website.

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Youth Voice, Youth Choice Vote Week is May 21-29

Youth Voice, Youth ChoiceDo you want a say in how to spend $700,000 of Seattle’s City budget? If you’re between the ages of 11 – 25 and live, work, or go to school in Seattle, YOU CAN!

Youth can cast votes for their favorite project ideas during our Youth Voice, Youth Choice Vote Week taking place May 21-29.

Youth Voice, Youth Choice is a new participatory budgeting initiative of the City of Seattle in which youth ages 11-25 democratically decide how to spend a portion of the City’s budget. After several months of collecting ideas from community members, and youth volunteers turning those ideas into proposals, we’re readying for the vote which will occur Saturday, May 21 through Sunday, May 29. Youth will cast votes for their favorite projects, ranging from park improvements to youth programs to arts funding.

Make a difference in your community! Cast your vote at an in-person polling site or vote online. The projects that receive the most votes will be funded by the City!

Visit our webpage the week before vote week to see the list of projects and get information on how and where to vote.

If you work with youth in the Seattle area, you can also host an in-person Polling Site of your own to make sure as many youth as possible have a chance to participate in this important vote. Polling Sites can be hosted at an existing meeting, in a community center, or a public place (like outside a transit center or other heavily trafficked area, as long as you have permission from the property owner). You just need to complete our Polling Site Registration Form.

GET OUT THE VOTE! If you’d like to post about Youth Voice, Youth Choice, use the hashtag #YouthVoiceSea.

 


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Neighbors Invited to Help Plan Aurora-Licton Find It, Fix It Community Walk

Mayor Murray on Find It, Fix It Community Walk

The Aurora-Licton community is invited to help plan the Aurora-Licton Find It, Fix It Community Walk, the first of seven Mayor-led walks happening this year. During these walks, neighbors, police, and City officials walk together to identify physical elements in the neighborhood that make it feel unsafe or poorly maintained. Examples include overgrown trees, graffiti, street light outages, and litter. Once the elements are identified, the City and community work together to fix the problems.

The Aurora-Licton walk will be held on Tuesday, May 31 from 6 – 7:30 p.m and will be centered on the area around Aurora Avenue N between N. 84th and 110th Streets and will follow a route determined by community members serving on its Community Walk Action Team. If you are interested in serving on this team, contact Find It, Fix It Program Coordinator Hilary Nichols at hilary.nichols@seattle.gov or 206.386.1907.

In addition, Aurora-Licton residents are invited to apply for up to $5000 to complete community projects that improve the safety or appearance of their neighborhood. To apply for the Aurora-Licton Community Project Grants, community members can find the application at seattle.gov/finditfixit beginning Wednesday, May 25 through Friday, June 10.

Lastly, community members don’t have to wait for the walk to report safety needs or city maintenance issues. They can use the Find It, Fix It mobile app:

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