Summer Opportunity Fund Awards $75,000 to Five Community Projects Focused on Young Men of Color

Summer Opportunity FundThe City of Seattle has announced the awards for the Summer Opportunity Fund, a $75,000 fund created to support community-based projects that address and help reduce violence against young adults. The fund was open to community organizations, groups, and businesses to apply.

To be considered, projects needed to focus on education, employment, justice, violence prevention, health, or a combination of these topics. The City also sought community-based ideas and projects that leveraged other resources such as community partnerships, in-kind donations, and existing resources and services.

The awarded organizations and projects are:

  • $15,000 to 180 Program to provide peer training and leadership development for young men of color focused on healing circles, peacemaking, and a UW lecture and campus tour, along with mentoring, job placement and social services connections.
  • $14,985 to Multi-Communities for the Men’s Circle Journey Project, a facilitated support group for East African and African American men to foster and enhance emotional intelligence, increase self-esteem and respect, provide a safe place to talk, learn and heal, and foster authenticity in actions.
  • $14,995 to Somali Family Task Force for a three-month program designed to promote and empower 18-24-year-old East African young men’s healthy development and transition through emerging adulthood by providing mentoring/mentorship, educational preparedness, and job readiness skills building.
  • $15,000 to Guiding Academic Motivation for Excellence for a leadership development, empowerment, and community awareness project for 15 East African and African American males to include a walk-a-thon/community march, a community education rally and cookout, and a youth talent and fashion show produced by the participants.
  • $15,000 to Brothers United in Leadership Development to host BUILD the Hood events that highlight culture, healthy lifestyles, and environmental and social activities, and a resource fair for young black men and their families; in addition to a barbershop series to bring issues around education, justice, employment, and health to cultivate inter-generational relationships.

All projects will begin this summer and will be completed this fall. The Summer Opportunity Fund is funded by the Seattle Human Services Department and administered by Seattle Department of Neighborhoods.

Share Button

Apply for Funding to Create Your Own Park

Seattle Park(ing) DayWant to create your own (temporary) public park and get funding from the city to do it?!

Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) is now accepting applications to turn on-street parking spaces into pop-up parks and street improvements for its annual PARK(ing) Day Plus+ event in September. Each year, residents, businesses, and organizations participate in the international PARK(ing) Day program to engage their communities in rethinking how streets can be used.

Through our Small Sparks Fund, the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods can provide you up to $1,000 in matching funds to support your one-of-a-kind pop-up park! Funds can be used for outreach materials, park supplies, cultural activities, games, astroturf, and more.

Grant applications must be submitted by August 5 via our online application. If you are interested and have questions, please send an email to NMFund@seattle.gov or call (206) 233-0093.

Also, be sure to also submit your separate PARK(ing) Day Plus+ application to the Department of Transportation by the August 5 deadline. The short, free application can be found on SDOT’s website. It requires a site plan, location description, and documentation of neighbor notification. Completed applications or questions can be emailed to David.Burgesser@seattle.gov.

Seattle has participated in PARK(ing) Day since 2007, and based on its success, SDOT is expanding the event into PARK(ing) Day Plus+ this year. It will now span two days: Friday, September 16 and Saturday, September 17. In addition, applicants are encouraged test out temporary street improvements, such as bike lanes and sidewalks, as well as the pop-up parks that have been the focus of the event in the past.

More information about PARK(ing) Day Plus+, including application examples and guidelines, can be found on SDOT’s website. They’ve also included a photo gallery of past PARK(ing) Day installations, so take a peek and get inspired!

Share Button

Roxhill and Westwood Neighbors: Help Plan Your Find It, Fix It Community Walk

Find It, Fix It Community Walk

Aurora/Licton Springs Community Walk – May 2016

Roxhill and Westwood neighbors are invited to help plan the Roxhill/Westwood Find It, Fix It Community Walk, the third of seven Mayor-led walks happening this year. Find It, Fix It Community Walks bring together City officials, business owners, and community members to address neighborhood needs.

The Roxhill/Westwood walk will be held on Monday, July 25 from 6:30 – 8:00pm and will follow a route determined by community members serving on its Community Walk Action Team. If you are interested in serving on this team, contact Find It, Fix It Program Coordinator Laura Jenkins at laura.jenkins@seattle.gov or 206.233.5166.

In addition, Roxhill/Westwood community members are invited to apply for up to $5,000 to complete community projects that improve the safety or appearance of their neighborhood. To apply for a Community Project Grant, community members can find the application at seattle.gov/finditfixit beginning Monday, July 18 through Wednesday, August 3.

Lastly, community members don’t have to wait for the walk to report safety needs or city maintenance issues. They can use the Find It, Fix It mobile app. Android users can download the app from the Google Play Store and iPhone users can download it from the App Store.

Share Button

Visit a City Landmark in Your Neighborhood

DiLPBDesg_McGilvraElementary_2-credit-NK-Architectsd you know that Seattle has more than 450 historic landmarks across the city? And that not all of them are buildings? Boats, artworks, vehicles, and even street clocks are designated landmarks and protected by city ordinance.

To find a Seattle landmark in your neighborhood, visit our map or view the list of landmarks.

Share Button

High Point and NewHolly Farm Stands Open This Week

Market Garden Farm StandFor fresh organic produce look no further than the High Point and NewHolly Farm Stands opening for the season this week. The farm stands offer produce picked right from the P-Patch market gardens and grown by low-income residents of the High Point and NewHolly Seattle Housing Authority (SHA) neighborhoods. The hours of operation are 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

  • High Point Farm Stand (32nd SW and SW Juneau Street) open Wednesdays from June 29 to September 28.
  • NewHolly Farm Stand (S. Holly Park Dr. between 40th S. and Rockery Dr. S.) open Fridays from July 1 to September 30.

Both farm stands accept EBT cards and participate in Fresh Bucks which doubles consumers’ first $10 spent on the card. Come see the gardens, meet the farmers, and enjoy their fresh produce.

The High Point Farm Stand will again host ROAR, the mobile farm stand that sells produce to neighborhoods with limited access to healthy food. The food is grown by local farmers across Puget Sound.

Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens is a program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods P-Patch Community Gardening Program to support low-income gardeners and their neighborhoods. Its mission is to establish safe, healthy communities and economic opportunity through Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and farm stand enterprises. To learn more, visit seattle.gov/neighborhoods/p-patch-community-gardening/market-gardens.

Share Button

Belltown Find It, Fix It Community Walk

Find It, Fix It Community WalkMayor Murray’s Find It, Fix It Community Walks provide a unique opportunity for community members to identify neighborhood needs and discuss challenges directly with City leaders. The second walk of the year will be held in Belltown on Tuesday, June 28.

Belltown Find It, Fix It Community Walk
Tuesday, June 28, 2016
Sign-in and refreshments provided by Starbucks from 5:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Program and walk from 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Meet at the Belltown Community Center located at 5th Ave and Bell St (415 Bell St)

Schedule
5:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

  • Sign-in and refreshments at Belltown Community Center


6:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.

  • Welcome remarks from Mayor Ed Murray


6:15 p.m. – 7:25 p.m.

  • Walk commences along the following route (map):
    • West on Bell St.
    • North on 2nd
    • West on Vine St.
    • East on Battery St.
    • West on Bell St.


7:25 pm – 7:30 p.m.

  • Walk concludes at Western Ave and Bell Street
  • City department representatives available for follow-up questions

 

Participants can use the Find It, Fix It mobile app on the walk. This smartphone app offers mobile users one more way to report selected issues to the City. Make sure to download the app before the walk.

In partnership with Cities of Service, the City will offer up to $5,000 in grants for community-led projects to each 2016 Find It, Fix It Walk neighborhood. The Belltown Community Project Grant Application is available on June 23 at www.seattle.gov/finditfixit until Friday, July 8. If you have an idea for a project in Belltown, apply today!

For more information on the Find It, Fix It Community Walks program, contact Laura Jenkins at 206.233.5166 or laura.jenkins@seattle.gov or visit www.seattle.gov/finditfixit.

Share Button

CSA Subscriptions Available from Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens

Seattle P-Patch Market GardensYou can receive up to 18 weeks of high quality, farm-fresh, organic produce when you subscribe to the Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens CSA (community-supported agriculture). Each week subscribers will receive up to 15 items of organic seasonal produce grown at the NewHolly and High Point Seattle Market Gardens, a Seattle Department of Neighborhoods program that helps to establish healthy communities and economic opportunity in low-income neighborhoods.

The cost ranges from $15 to $25 a week based on the size of the share with prorated shares available. Two of the pick-up locations are located at the gardens where subscribers can meet the immigrant farmers and visit the site.

The pick-up locations, dates, and times are:

Thursday evenings, now through October 13 from 5:00-7:00 p.m. at:
High Point Market Garden (32nd Avenue SW and SW Juneau Street)
NewHolly Market Garden (42nd South and South Rockery Drive)

Saturdays, now through October 15 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at:
St. Andrews Episcopal Church (111 NE 80th Street)

Community members can subscribe now by completing and mailing an application (see form for address); or you can contact Michelle Jones at 206-372-6593 or Julie Bryan, P-Patch Garden Coordinator, at 206-684-0540.


Seattle P-Patch Market Gardens is a program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods P-Patch Community Gardening Program in collaboration with the Seattle Housing Authority and GROW to support low-income gardeners. Its mission is to establish safe, healthy communities and economic opportunity through Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and farm stand enterprises.

Share Button

Mayor Murray Seeks New Members for Pioneer Square Preservation Board

Pioneer Square Postcard

Postcard collection (Record Series 9901-01), Seattle Municipal Archives

Mayor Edward Murray is seeking two new members to serve on the Pioneer Square Preservation Board in the following positions – attorney and Pioneer Square retail business owner. Individuals who have an interest in historic preservation and/or familiarity with Pioneer Square are encouraged to apply.

The 10-member Pioneer Square Preservation Board reviews facade alterations, signs, new construction, changes of use, and street improvements and makes recommendations to Seattle Department of Neighborhoods Director for all properties within the Pioneer Square Preservation District. The board is composed of two district property owners, two architects and one of each of the following – retail business owner, attorney, historian/ architectural historian, human services representative, a young adult appointed through the Get Engaged Boards and Commissions program, and a member-at-large. All appointments are made by the Mayor and subject to City Council confirmation.

Board meetings are held on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 9:00 a.m. In addition, board members may be asked to serve on an additional committee which meets twice a month. In general, board members must commit approximately 6 – 12 hours per month to Board business.

Interested applicants must be Seattle residents, and Board members serve without compensation. Those interested in being considered should send a letter of interest and resume by Friday, July 8. Electronic submissions are preferred, if possible.

Please email your letter and resume to: genna.nashem@seattle.gov
(reference the Pioneer Square Preservation Board in the subject line)

To submit a paper copy, please address:

Genna Nashem
Pioneer Square Preservation Board Coordinator
Seattle Department of Neighborhoods
P.O. Box 94649
Seattle, WA 98124-4649

For more information, contact Genna Nashem at (206) 684-0227.


The Pioneer Square Preservation District is one of eight historic districts managed by the Historic Preservation Program of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods.

The City of Seattle is committed to promoting diversity in the city’s boards and commissions. Women, persons with disabilities, sexual and gender minorities, young persons, senior citizens, persons of color, and immigrants are encouraged to apply.

Share Button

Join the Conversation on Housing Affordability & Livability

HALA Focus GroupIn the last five years, rents in Seattle have increased 35% and the homeless population is nearing 3,000.

“We are facing our worst housing affordability crisis in decades,” says Mayor Murray.“My vision is a city where people who work in Seattle can afford to live here.”

The Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda (HALA), is a set of strategies intended to address this crisis from all sides. The City is relying heavily on public input to take these strategies from ideas to practice and would love to hear from you.

The HALA Team has a cool online conversation called “Consider it” (https://hala.consider.it/) where you can weigh in alongside your neighbors and engage in dialogue around the City’s HALA proposals. When you go to the site, you’ll see a list of topics where you can view the proposals and read others’ comments. If you want to participate in the conversation, you’ll be prompted to create an easy log-in. The HALA team will be adding ideas to the site and looking for folks to return and check in as new topics are added. The City is committed to listening to the community and using the feedback it hears to shape the policies and practices of HALA.

This is civic engagement at work—join the conversation!

Share Button

Youth Tell the City How to Spend $700,000 of Public Funds

Youth Voice, Youth ChoiceMayor Ed Murray has announced the project winners of Youth Voice, Youth Choice, the City’s new Participatory Budgeting (PB) initiative in which youth decide how to spend $700,000 of the City’s budget. More than 3,000 youth ages 11-25 voted on 19 project proposals in May.

The seven winning projects are:

  • Houses for People Experiencing Homelessness
  • Youth Homeless Shelter Improvements
  • Job Readiness Workshops for Homeless Youth
  • Homeless Children and Youth Liaison Services
  • Wi-Fi Hotspot Checkout
  • Park Bathroom Upgrades
  • Safe Routes to Schools

Thanks to the leadership of former Councilmember Nick Licata, we launched participatory budgeting to empower the youth of Seattle and to show them that their voice matters in shaping this city. Through this process, we learned that young people are concerned about the homelessness crisis gripping our city, as well as issues of equity and public safety. They want to help those who are suffering and to create safer streets for walking or biking.” – Mayor Ed Murray

The process started in January with several assemblies where the public brainstormed ideas for projects it would like to see in their communities. The 20 youth delegates turned those ideas into 19 concrete proposals with help from Seattle Department of Neighborhoods and City staff. Now that the choices have been made, City staff and local agencies will implement the projects.

“We are thrilled to see that so many youth participated in this program,” said Kathy Nyland, director of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods. “Over 3,000 have spoken and we have heard them. It’s now up to us to implement these ideas so these projects become a reality.”

Participatory Budgeting is a civic engagement program in which community members decide how to spend a portion of a City’s budget. Seattle has joined Chicago, New York, Boston, and cities across the globe in using the process. Youth Voice, Youth Choice is managed by Seattle Department of Neighborhoods.

For more information, contact Jenny Frankl at 206-233-2044 or visit the Youth Voice, Youth Choice website.

Share Button